destitution

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French destitution, from Latin dēstitūtiōnem (abandoning), from dēstituere.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɛstɪˈtjuːʃən/, /dɛstɪˈtʃuːʃən/

Noun[edit]

destitution (plural destitutions)

  1. (obsolete) The action of deserting or abandoning.
  2. (now rare) Discharge from office; dismissal.
  3. The condition of lacking something.
    • 1906, ‘Mark Twain’, in The Bible According to Mark Twain, 1996, p. 330:
      He requires of his fellow man obedience to a very creditable code of morals, but he observes without shame or disapproval his God's utter destitution of morals.
  4. An extreme state of poverty, in which a person is almost completely lacking in resources or means of support.
    • 2009, Rahila Gupta, The Guardian, 4 Aug 2009:
      Destitution forces many asylum seekers to end up working for extremely low wages in catering, cleaning and construction, for example, without any protection against unscrupulous employers.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin dēstitūtiōnem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

destitution f (plural destitutions)

  1. discharge, dismissal
  2. deposition (of a politician etc.)