epocha

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See also: épocha

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin

Noun[edit]

epocha (plural epochas)

  1. Archaic form of epoch.
    • 1773, John Adams, “1773. Decr. 17th”, in Diary of John Adams, Volume 2, page 85-86:
      This Destruction of the Tea is so bold, so daring, so firm, intrepid and inflexible, and it must have so important Consequences, and so lasting, that I cant but consider it as an Epocha in History.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for epocha in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

epocha f

  1. epoch

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἐποχή (epokhḗ, a check, cessation, stop, pause, epoch of a star, i.e., the point at which it seems to halt after reaching the highest, and generally the place of a star; hence, a historical epoch), from ἐπέχω (epékhō, I hold in, check), from ἐπι- (epi-, upon) + ἔχω (ékhō, I have, hold).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

epocha f (genitive epochae); first declension

  1. (Medieval Latin) age, period, time, season, epoch (particular period of history)

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative epocha epochae
Genitive epochae epochārum
Dative epochae epochīs
Accusative epocham epochās
Ablative epochā epochīs
Vocative epocha epochae

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

epocha f (plural epochas)

  1. Obsolete spelling of época (used in Portugal until September 1911 and died out in Brazil during the 1920s).