epocha

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See also: épocha

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Medieval Latin epocha

Noun[edit]

epocha (plural epochas)

  1. Obsolete form of epoch. [17th–19th c.]
    • 1773, John Adams, “1773. Decr. 17th”, in Diary of John Adams, Volume 2, page 85-86:
      This Destruction of the Tea is so bold, so daring, so firm, intrepid and inflexible, and it must have so important Consequences, and so lasting, that I cant but consider it as an Epocha in History.
    • 1790, Helen Maria Williams, Letters Written in France, Broadview 2002, p. 70:
      [T]hese dancers were the very men whose bravery formed the great epocha of French liberty; the heroes who demolished the towers of the Bastille, and whose fame will descend to the latest posterity.

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

epocha f

  1. epoch

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • epocha in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • epocha in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἐποχή (epokhḗ, a check, cessation, stop, pause, epoch of a star, i.e., the point at which it seems to halt after reaching the highest, and generally the place of a star; hence, a historical epoch), from ἐπέχω (epékhō, I hold in, check), from ἐπι- (epi-, upon) + ἔχω (ékhō, I have, hold).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

epocha f (genitive epochae); first declension

  1. (Medieval Latin) age, period, time, season, epoch (particular period of history)

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative epocha epochae
Genitive epochae epochārum
Dative epochae epochīs
Accusative epocham epochās
Ablative epochā epochīs
Vocative epocha epochae

Descendants[edit]

  • English: epocha, epoch
  • German: Epoche

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

epocha f (plural epochas)

  1. Obsolete spelling of época (used in Portugal until September 1911 and died out in Brazil during the 1920s).