fash

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From early modern French fascher (now fâcher), from Latin fastus (disdain).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fæʃ/
  • (file)
    Rhymes: -æʃ

Verb[edit]

fash (third-person singular simple present fashes, present participle fashing or fashin, simple past and past participle fashed)

  1. (transitive, Scotland, Tyneside, Northern England) To worry; to bother, annoy.
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula, Chapter 6:
      "I wouldn't fash masel' about them, miss. Them things be all wore out."
  2. (intransitive, Scotland, Tyneside, Northern England) To trouble oneself; to take pains.
    • 1886, Robert Louis Stevenson, Kidnapped
      “They,” said he, meaning the collops, “are such as I gave his Royal Highness in this very house; bating the lemon juice, for at that time we were glad to get the meat and never fashed for kitchen. Indeed, there were mair dragoons than lemons in my country in the year forty-six.”
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

fash (plural fashes)

  1. (Scotland, Tyneside, Northern England) A worry; trouble; bother.
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Whites Latin-English Dictionary: 1899.
  • Concise Oxford: 1984.
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[1]
  • Frank Graham (1987) The New Geordie Dictionary, →ISBN
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [2]

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of fascist

Noun[edit]

fash (plural fash)

  1. (slang, especially Britain) A fascist, a member of the far-right.
    • 1945, Information Bulletin ..., volume 5 (issues 66-131):
      The Butchers Here is an old Munich policeman — Wilhelm Frick with eyes like those of a fash.
    • 2017, Katessa Harkey, The Peace of the Hall: Rules of Engagement for the New Witch Wars, (→ISBN), page 90:
      It is not they, with their comfortable middle class speaking-tour and festival-circuit lives, who will put on the black and go punch a Nazi or bash a fash. No. It will be the vulnerable, overwhelmingly queer, poor youth [...]
  2. (slang, in the plural, especially Britain) The far-right, especially violent far-right demonstrators, collectively.
    • 1996, Ajay Close, Official and doubtful, Random House (UK)
      Used to go down to London on bash-the-fash awaydays; turn up at National Front marches and give them a toeing.
    • 2012, Dan Todd, One Man's Revolution, Andrews UK Limited →ISBN
      Five of our lads had just watched the riot police go into the Wellington and give the fash a kicking.
    • 2012, Dave Hann, Physical Resistance: A Hundred Years of Anti-Fascism, John Hunt Publishing →ISBN
      The women in NP at the time were very good spotters and we had good access to intel, photos etc. on the fash.
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

fash

  1. (slang) To make something fascist.

Anagrams[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From early modern French fascher (now fâcher), from Latin fastus (disdain).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fash (third-person singular present fashes, present participle fashin, past fasht, past participle fasht)

  1. (transitive) To bother, worry, annoy.

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

fash

  1. confusion, shame

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith