fash

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From early modern French fascher (now fâcher), from Latin fastus (disdain).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fæʃ/
  • (file)
    Rhymes: -æʃ

Verb[edit]

fash (third-person singular simple present fashes, present participle fashing or fashin, simple past and past participle fashed)

  1. (transitive, Scotland, Geordie, Northern England) To worry; to bother, annoy.
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula, Chapter 6:
      "I wouldn't fash masel' about them, miss. Them things be all wore out."
  2. (intransitive, Scotland, Geordie, Northern England) To trouble oneself; to take pains.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

fash (plural fashes)

  1. (Scotland, Geordie, Northern England) A worry; trouble; bother.
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Whites Latin-English Dictionary: 1899.
  • Consise Oxford: 1984.
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[1]
  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, →ISBN
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [2]

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of fascist.

Noun[edit]

fash (plural fash)

  1. (slang, especially Britain) A fascist, a member of the far-right.
    • 1945, Information Bulletin ..., volume 5 (issues 66-131):
      The Butchers Here is an old Munich policeman — Wilhelm Frick with eyes like those of a fash.
    • 2017, Katessa Harkey, The Peace of the Hall: Rules of Engagement for the New Witch Wars, (→ISBN), page 90:
      It is not they, with their comfortable middle class speaking-tour and festival-circuit lives, who will put on the black and go punch a Nazi or bash a fash. No. It will be the vulnerable, overwhelmingly queer, poor youth [...]
  2. (slang, plural, especially Britain) The far-right, especially violent far-right demonstrators, collectively.
    • 1996, Ajay Close, Official and doubtful, Random House (UK)
      Used to go down to London on bash-the-fash awaydays; turn up at National Front marches and give them a toeing.
    • 2012, Dan Todd, One Man's Revolution, Andrews UK Limited →ISBN
      Five of our lads had just watched the riot police go into the Wellington and give the fash a kicking.
    • 2012, Dave Hann, Physical Resistance: A Hundred Years of Anti-Fascism, John Hunt Publishing →ISBN
      The women in NP at the time were very good spotters and we had good access to intel, photos etc. on the fash.

Verb[edit]

fash

  1. (slang) To make something fascist.

Anagrams[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From early modern French fascher (now fâcher), from Latin fastus (disdain).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fash (third-person singular present fashes, present participle fashin, past fasht, past participle fasht)

  1. (transitive) To bother, worry, annoy.