flam

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Flam and flám

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /flæm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æm

Etymology 1[edit]

17th century; from flim-flam,[1] itself perhaps from a dialectal word or Scandinavian; compare Old Norse flim (lampoon, mockery).[2]

Noun[edit]

flam (countable and uncountable, plural flams)

  1. A freak or whim; an idle fancy.
  2. (archaic) A falsehood; a lie; an illusory pretext
    Synonyms: deception, delusion
    • 1692, Robert South, "A Further Account of the Nature and Measures of Conscience", in Forty Eight Sermons and Discourses on Several Subjects and Occasions (published 1697)
      all Pretences, or Pleas of Conscience, to the contrary, are nothing but Cant and Cheat, Flam and Delusion.
    • 1692–1717, Robert South, Twelve Sermons Preached upon Several Occasions, volume (please specify |volume=I to VI), 6th edition, London: [] J[ames] Bettenham, for Jonah Bowyer, [], published 1727, OCLC 21766567:
      a perpetual abuse and flam upon posterity
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

flam (third-person singular simple present flams, present participle flamming, simple past and past participle flammed)

  1. (obsolete) To deceive with a falsehood.
    • 1692–1717, Robert South, Twelve Sermons Preached upon Several Occasions, volume (please specify |volume=I to VI), 6th edition, London: [] J[ames] Bettenham, for Jonah Bowyer, [], published 1727, OCLC 21766567:
      God is not to be flammed off with Lyes.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Imitative.

Noun[edit]

flam (plural flams)

  1. (drumming) Two taps (a grace note followed by a full-volume tap) played very close together in order to sound like one slightly longer note.
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

flam (third-person singular simple present flams, present participle flamming, simple past and past participle flammed)

  1. (drumming, transitive, intransitive) To play (notes as) a flam.
    • 1923, Edward B. Straight, The Straight System of Modern Drumming: The "Natural Way" to Play Drums, page 10:
      We will commence to flam the notes now, as most of them are flammed when you play a March.
    • 1975, George Shipway, Free Lance, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt P (→ISBN):
      Drums ruffled and flammed.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Flimflam / Claptrap, The Word Detective, 2009–04–13
  2. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “flam”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French flan, from Old French flaon. Doublet of flaó.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flam m (plural flams)

  1. flan (custard dessert)

Further reading[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

flam (nominative plural flams)

  1. flame

Declension[edit]