flan

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed around 1846 from French flan (cheesecake, custard tart, flan), or in some uses (in reference to Spanish/Latin American flans) later from Spanish flan (itself from the French), both from Old French flaon (whence also Middle English flaon, flaun (pie; cake)), from Late Latin fladonem, accusative of fladō (flat cake), from Frankish *flaþō (flat cake), from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₂t- (broad, flat), from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂- (to spread out, be broad, be flat); compare German Fladen. Akin to Old High German flado (flat cake, offering cake). More at flathe.

Although the -n is generally believed to derive from the Late Latin accusative form (fladonem) of fladō (flat cake), it might alternatively derive from an inflected form of the Frankish word (such as the Frankish accusative *flaþan, or the like). For a similar case, see garden.

A savory flan (non-dessert)
A flan (custard dessert) from India

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flan (plural flans)

  1. (chiefly Britain, Australia) Baked tart with sweet or savoury filling in an open-topped pastry case. (Compare quiche.)
    • 2004, Shawn Blore, ‎Alexandra de Vries, Frommer's Brazil →ISBN, page 175:
      The menu includes a number of excellent fish dishes such as the [] broccoli flan.
  2. (chiefly US, Belize) A dessert of congealed custard, often topped with caramel, especially popular in Spanish-speaking countries.
    Synonym: crème caramel
  3. (numismatics) A coin die. (Compare planchet.)
Usage notes[edit]
  • In the UK and Australia, flan usually refers to a baked tart (sense 1), and would only refer to a custard dessert (sense 2) rarely and in the context of the cuisine of Latin American or Mediterranean countries which use the word in that way. In the US, flan usually refers to the (Latin American-derived) custard dessert (sense 2), though uses of sense 1 can also be found.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

English, from a slip of the tongue by actor Nathan Fillion.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flan (plural flans)

  1. (informal, fandom slang) A fan of the U.S. TV series Firefly.
    Synonym: Browncoat
    • 2005 January 29, P. Burrows, “Re: Name for Lost fans?”, in rec.arts.sf.tv, Usenet[1]:
      (some) Firefly flans call themselves Browncoats (Remember, the hot movie from Universal is out this September! :)
    • 2006 June 18, Geoff Aldrich, “Re: SciFi promotion [Was Firefly fans skew older?]”, in alt.tv.firefly, Usenet[2]:
      For what it's worth, I'm 27 and am a huge Firefly/Serenity flan.
    • 2007 January 21, Tal, “Re: Nude Jewel Staite? Close enough.”, in alt.tv.firefly, Usenet[3]:
      I'm glad this wasn't the first flan group I came across or I would never have realised the great nature of the majority of browncoasts.[sic]
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:flan.

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French flaon, from Late Latin fladō (flat cake), from Frankish *flaþō (flat cake), from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₂t- (broad, flat), from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂- (to spread out, be broad, be flat). Akin to Old High German flado (flat cake, offering cake) (German Fladen), Dutch vla (baked custard).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flan m (plural flans)

  1. baked custard tart
  2. coin die

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

flan

  1. Alternative form of flon

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *flainaz (hook, spear with a tip), from Proto-Indo-European *pleyn- (metal arrow, hook, spear-head). Akin to Old Norse fleinn (hook, barbed weapon, javelin, arrow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flān m or f

  1. arrow

Declension[edit]

(when masculine)

(when feminine)

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: flon, ffloon, flone, flan
    • English: flone
    • Scots: flane, flain

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French flan, from Old French flaon, from Late Latin fladō (flat cake), from Frankish *flaþō (flat cake), from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₂t- (broad, flat), from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂- (to spread out, be broad, be flat).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flan m (plural flanes)

  1. flan, sweet pudding

Derived terms[edit]