flot

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See also: flöt and fløt

Crimean Tatar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Dutch vloot ‎(fleet).

Noun[edit]

flot

  1. fleet

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French flot ‎(considerable quantity of poured liquid, stream, flow), from Old French flot ‎(mass of moving water, flood, tidal flow), partly from Old Norse flóð ‎(stream, river, flood, massive flow of water); partly from Frankish *flota ‎(flux, streaming flow); and partly from Frankish *flōd ‎(river, flood); all from Proto-Germanic *flōduz ‎(river), Proto-Germanic *flutōną ‎(flow), from Proto-Indo-European *plōw- ‎(to pour, wash). Cognate with Old Dutch fluod ‎(river), Old High German fluot ‎(flood), Old English flōd ‎(river, flood), Gothic 𐍆𐌻𐍉𐌳𐌿𐍃 ‎(flōdus, river, stream). More at fleuve, flood, flow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flot m ‎(plural flots)

  1. (in the plural, literary) waves
  2. stream, flood (large amount)
    J'ai reçu un flot de lettres. — I received a flood of letters.
  3. incoming tide (of the sea); floodtide

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Partly from Old Norse flóð ‎(stream, river, flood, massive flow of water); partly from Frankish *flota ‎(flux, streaming flow); and partly from Frankish *flōd ‎(river, flood); all from Proto-Germanic *flōduz ‎(river), Proto-Germanic *flutōną ‎(flow), from Proto-Indo-European *plōw- ‎(to pour, wash).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

flot m ‎(oblique plural floz or flotz, nominative singular floz or flotz, nominative plural flot)

  1. wave, billow; surge on the surface of a body of water agitated by winds
  2. a large expanse of moving water, flood; river
  3. current, stream

Related terms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flot

  1. genitive plural of flota