gaffer

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See also: Gaffer

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English gaffe ‎(a hook) + -er. The natural lighting on early film sets was adjusted by opening and closing flaps in the tent cloths, called gaff cloths or gaff flaps.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gaffer ‎(plural gaffers)

  1. (film) A chief lighting technician for a motion-picture or television production.
  2. A glassblower.
    • 2003, Jennifer Bosveld, Glass Works (page 18)
      The apprentice carries a gather of glass on the blowpipe to the gaffer's bench []
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
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Etymology 2[edit]

Likely a contraction of godfather, but with the vowels influenced by grandfather. Compare French compère, German Gevatter.

Noun[edit]

gaffer ‎(plural gaffers)

  1. (colloquial) An old man.
  2. (Britain) A foreman.
  3. An "Old Gaffer" is a sailor.
  4. In Maritime regions "the Little Gaffer" is the baby in the house.
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

gaffe +‎ -er

Verb[edit]

gaffer

  1. to make a gaffe; to mess up; botch up
  2. to gaffer tape

Conjugation[edit]

External links[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Verb[edit]

gaffer

  1. (Jersey) to grasp

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gaffer

  1. Soft mutation of caffer.