galore

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

PIE word
*ḱóm

Borrowed from Irish go leor and Scottish Gaelic gu leòr, gu leòir (till sufficient, enough, plenty) (compare Manx dy liooar), from Irish go, Scottish Gaelic gu (to; till, until) + Irish leor, Scottish Gaelic leòr (ample, sufficient); go, gu are derived from Old Irish co, cu (with), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (beside, by; near; with); while leor, leòr are from Old Irish leor, from lour (enough, sufficient), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *leh₂w- (to gain; to seize; a benefit; a prize).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

galore (not comparable)

  1. (postpositive) In abundance. [from late 17th c.]
    Synonyms: aplenty; see also Thesaurus:abundant
    Antonyms: see Thesaurus:rare
    After the shipwreck there was whisky galore to be had for the taking.
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 564:
      [] But when I had bestridden the plank, quoth I to myself, "Thou deserveth all that betideth thee. All this is decreed to me of Allah (whose name be exalted!), to turn me from my greed of gain, whence ariseth all that I endure, for I have wealth galore."

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

galore (plural galores)

  1. (archaic) An abundance; plenty.
    • 1857, Journal of Australasia (volume 2, page 38)
      The usual routine of confections and pastry follows, after which a galore of fruits of all kinds, with a chassè of excellent Mocha, the immediate servitude of which, after good dining, is, I think, universally acknowledged to be a great exhiliration.[sic, meaning exhilaration]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Compare “galore, [adj.] and n.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2021; “galore, adj.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]