lour

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The verb is derived from Middle English louren, lour, loure (to frown or scowl; to be dark or overcast; to droop, fade, wither; to lurk, skulk),[1] probably from Old English *lūran, *lūrian,[2] from Proto-Germanic *lūraną (to lie in wait, lurk). The English word is cognate with Danish lure (to lie in ambush; to take a nap), Middle Dutch loeren (modern Dutch loeren (to lurk, spy on)), Middle Low German lūren (to lie in ambush), German Low German luren (to lurk), Middle High German lūren (to lie in ambush) (modern German lauern (to lie in ambush; to lurk)), Icelandic lúra (to take a nap), Saterland Frisian luurje (to lie in wait), West Frisian loere (to lurk), and Swedish lura (to lie in ambush; to deceive, fool, trick; to lure; to take a nap);[2] and is related to lurk.

The noun is derived from the verb.[3]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lour (third-person singular simple present lours, present participle louring, simple past and past participle loured)

  1. (intransitive) To frown; to look sullen.
    Synonyms: glower, scowl
  2. (intransitive, figuratively) To be dark, gloomy, and threatening, as clouds; of the sky: to be covered with dark and threatening clouds; to show threatening signs of approach, as a tempest.

Alternative forms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

lour (plural lours)

  1. A frown, a scowl; an angry or sullen look.
    • 1798, attributed to Richard Griffith or Laurence Sterne, The Koran: Or, Essays, Sentiments, Characters, and Callimachies, of Tria Juncta in Uno, M.N.A. or Master of No Arts. Three Volumes Complete in One, volume II, Vienna: Printed for R[udolf] Sammer, bookseller, OCLC 801132671, paragraph 49, page 156:
      I have ſuch averſion to ill temper, that I could ſooner forgive my wife adultery, than croſſneſs. I cannot taſte Caſſio's kiſs on her lips; but I can ſee a lour on her brow.
  2. (figuratively) Of the sky, the weather, etc.: a dark, gloomy, and threatening appearance.
    Synonyms: gloom, gloominess

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ lǒuren, v.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 1 March 2019.
  2. 2.0 2.1 lour, lower, v.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1903; “lower2, v.” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press.
  3. ^ lour, lower, n.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1903.

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lour m or f

  1. their (third-person plural possessive pronoun)

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *lawaros (compare Welsh llawer (a lot), from Proto-Indo-European *leh₂w- (benefit, prize); compare Ancient Greek λᾱρός (lārós, tasty).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lour

  1. enough, sufficient
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 159a3
      Is airi ní táet comṡuidigud fri rangabáil, húare as coibnesta do bréthir: ar is lour comṡuidigud fri suidi, air bid comṡuidigud etarscartha comṡuidigud rangabálae.
      This is why composition does not occur with a participle, because it is akin to a verb: for composition with the latter is sufficient, for composition of a participle will be separated composition.

Usage notes[edit]

Always predicative (and therefore uninflected) in Old Irish, but the Middle Irish descendant lór is used attributively.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Irish: lór

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
lour
also llour after a proclitic
lour
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]