geneat

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English ġenēat (companion, follower, follower in battle; dependant, vassal, tenant who works for a lord), from Proto-Germanic *ganautaz (comrade), from Proto-Indo-European *newd- (to acquire, make use of). Cognate with West Frisian genoat (comrade, companion), Dutch genoot (companion, mate), German Genosse (companion, comrade, fellow), Icelandic nautur (comrade, companion, fellow). More at note, neat.

Noun[edit]

geneat (plural geneat or geneats)

  1. (historical) A retainer; vassal; one who holds lands of a superior either by service or payment of rent.
    • 1861, C. H. Pearson, Early & Middle Ages Eng. I. 201:
      The tenants, cotsetlas, geburs, and geneats, were the highest among the semiservile.
    • 1872, E. W. Robertson, Hist. Ess. 101:
      The right of the husbandman was a share right, his name was Geneat or sharer in the vill.
    • 1892, F. Seebohm in Hist. Rev. July 458:
      In each manor there is the same division into land in demesne and land in villainage, the inland and the geneat land.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]