infierno

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Istriot[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin īnfernum, neuter form of īnfernus (of the lower regions). Compare Dalmatian infiarn.

Noun[edit]

infierno m

  1. hell
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 99:
      Là drento xì l’infierno naturale.
      But inside it is natural hell.

Old Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin īnfernum; attested from 1140[1]. Regarding the phonetics (Latin in normally becomes en in Spanish), the word was perhaps influenced or reinforced by the Ecclesiastical Latin pronunciation. There were similar developments in other Romance languages.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

infierno m (plural infiernos)

  1. (biblical) Sheol, the Hebrew term for the underworld; hell.
    • c. 1200, Almeric, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 6r. a.
      e dẏxo decédre / al infierno dolorioſo ſo por mẏo / fijo.
      And he said: "I shall descend to hell unto my son in mourning."
    • Idem, 8r.
      e ſi perdiere a beniamin deſcen / dre en mi ueieza enel ífierno. e / plorar lo he ẏ.
      And should I lose Benjamin I will descend to hell, in my old age, and I shall mourn him there.

Descendants[edit]

  • Spanish: infierno

References[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish infierno, from Latin īnfernum, neuter form of īnfernus (of the lower regions), based on īnferus (low).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /inˈfjeɾno/ [ĩɱˈfjeɾ.no]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɾno
  • Hyphenation: in‧fier‧no

Noun[edit]

infierno m (plural infiernos)

  1. hell

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]