inquisition

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Inquisition

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French inquisicion, from Latin inquisitio, from inquirere

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌɪŋkwɪˈzɪʃən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪʃən
  • Hyphenation: in‧qui‧si‧tion

Noun[edit]

inquisition (countable and uncountable, plural inquisitions)

  1. an investigation or inquiry into the truth of some matter
    • (Can we date this quote by Latimer and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      as I could learn through earnest inquisition
    • c. 1598–1600, William Shakespeare, “As You Like It”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene ii]:
      Let not search and inquisition quail / To bring again these foolish runaways.
  2. an inquest
  3. a questioning
  4. The finding of a jury, especially such a finding under a writ of inquiry.
    • (Can we date this quote by Blackstone and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      The justices in eyre had it formerly in charge to make inquisition concerning them by a jury of the county.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bouvier to this entry?)

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

inquisition (third-person singular simple present inquisitions, present participle inquisitioning, simple past and past participle inquisitioned)

  1. (obsolete) To make inquisition concerning; to inquire into.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French inquisicion, from Latin inquisitio

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

inquisition f (plural inquisitions)

  1. inquisition

References[edit]

inquisition” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).