writ

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English writ, iwrit, ȝewrit, from Old English writ (letter, book, treatise; scripture, writing; writ, charter, document, deed) and ġewrit (writing, something written, written language; written character, bookstave; inscription; orthography; written statement, passage from a book; official or formal document, document; law, jurisprudence; regulation; list, catalog; letter; text of an agreement; writ, charter, deed; literary writing, book, treatise; books dealing with a subject under notice; a book of the Bible; scripture, canonical book, the Scriptures; stylus), from Proto-Germanic *writą (fissure, writing), from Proto-Indo-European *wrey-, *wrī- (to scratch, carve, ingrave). Cognate with Scots writ (writ, writing, handwriting), Icelandic rit (writing, writ, literary work, publication).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɹɪt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Noun[edit]

writ (countable and uncountable, plural writs)

  1. (law) A written order, issued by a court, ordering someone to do (or stop doing) something.
  2. Authority, power to enforce compliance.
    • 2009, Stephen Gale et al., The War on Terrorism: 21st-Century Perspectives[1], Transaction Publishers, →ISBN, page 30:
      We can't let them take advantage of the fact that there are so many areas of the world where no one's writ runs.
    • 1913, Elizabeth Kimball Kendall, A Wayfarer in China
      Within Lololand, of course, no Chinese writ runs, no Chinese magistrate holds sway, and the people, more or less divided among themselves, are under the government of their tribal chiefs.
  3. (archaic) That which is written; writing.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for writ in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Verb[edit]

writ

  1. (archaic) past tense of write
  2. (archaic) past participle of write

Usage notes[edit]

  • The form writ survives in standard dialects in the phrase writ large as well as in works aiming for an intentionally poetic or archaic style. It remains common in some dialects (e.g. Scouse).

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

writ

  1. Romanization of 𐍅𐍂𐌹𐍄

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *writą, whence also Old High German riz, Old Norse rit.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

writ n (nominative plural writu)

  1. writ

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]