interrogatory

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Late Latin; equivalent to interrogate + -ory (pertaining to), or more distantly inter- + rogatory.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌɪntəˈɹɑɡəˌtɔɹi/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌɪntəˈɹɒɡətəɹi/, /ˌɪntəˈɹɒɡətɹi/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

interrogatory (plural interrogatories)

  1. (law) A formal question submitted to opposing party to answer, generally governed by court rule.
    • 1763-1783, Catharine Macaulay, The History of England from the Accession of James I to that of the Brunswick Line:
      Sidney interposed with an interrogatory concerning the legality of the evidence
    • 2013, James J. Gross, It's Splitsville: Surviving Your Divorce (page 240)
      If those attempts are unsuccessful, the attorney requesting the interrogatories may file a motion for sanctions with the court. The sanctions range from attorney fees to prohibiting the nonanswering party from presenting or defending claims.
  2. A question; an interrogation.

References[edit]

Adjective[edit]

interrogatory (comparative more interrogatory, superlative most interrogatory)

  1. Serving to interrogate; questioning.
    An interrogatory glance.