jupe

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See also: Jupe

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English jupe, from Middle French jupe. Doublet of jubbah.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jupe (plural jupes)

  1. A style of skirt.
  2. A style of short jacket, usually for a woman or child.
Related terms[edit]
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 2[edit]

Apparently named after an EFnet user called Jupiter who did this to NickServ

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jupe (plural jupes)

  1. (IRC) A block placed on a server, nickname or channel

Verb[edit]

jupe (third-person singular simple present jupes, present participle juping, simple past and past participle juped)

  1. (IRC) To block a server (from joining the network), a nickname or channel (from being used).

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French jupe, from Old Italian giubba, from Arabic جُبَّة(jubba, long garment).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʒyp/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

jupe f (plural jupes)

  1. skirt
    • 1994, Michel Houellebecq, Extension du domaine de la lutte:
      On était une bonne trentaine, rien que des cadres moyens âgés de vint-cinq à quarante ans. À un moment donné il y a une connasse qui a commencé à se déshabiller. Ella a ôté son T-shirt, puis son soutien-gorge, puis sa jupe, tout ça en faisant des mines incroyables.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Egyptian Arabic: جيبة(žība)
  • German: Jupe
  • Luxembourgish: Jupe
  • Spanish: chupa

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French jupe, from Old Italian giubba, from Arabic جُبَّة(jubba, long garment).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdʒiu̯p(ə)/, /ˈdʒuːp(ə)/

Noun[edit]

jupe

  1. A coat or tunic worn loosely.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: jupe
    • English: jump
      • English: jumper (see there for further descendants)
  • Scots: juip

References[edit]