kiti

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Jamamadí[edit]

Adjective[edit]

kiti

  1. (Banawá) strong

References[edit]

Kituba[edit]

Noun[edit]

kiti

  1. chair

Nupe[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognates include Yoruba òkìtì.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

kìtì (plural kìtìzhì)

  1. heap
  2. somersault
    Synonym: kángi

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

kiti (Cyrillic spelling кити)

  1. dative/locative singular of kita

Swahili[edit]

kiti
Swahili Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sw

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

kiti (ki-vi class, plural viti)

  1. chair (furniture)
  2. seat

Derived terms[edit]

Tagalog[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ki‧ti
  • IPA(key): /kiˈtiʔ/, [kɪˈtiʔ]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Hokkien, the first syllable of which most likely is from (ke, chicken), as noted by Chan-Yap (1980). The second syllable is proposed by Chan-Yap (1980) to mean young; tender, proposing the character (), which has no such meaning, but a similar sounding character (, young; immature) does.

Noun[edit]

kitî (Baybayin spelling ᜃᜒᜆᜒ)

  1. small chick; young of bird
    Synonyms: sisiw, inakay

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

kitî (Baybayin spelling ᜃᜒᜆᜒ)

  1. start of ebullition; appearance of small bubbles before boiling; effervescence
    Synonyms: bulak, sulak, bukal

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

kitî (Baybayin spelling ᜃᜒᜆᜒ)

  1. Alternative form of kiliti
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • kiti”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018
  • Chan-Yap, Gloria (1980) “Hokkien Chinese borrowings in Tagalog”, in Pacific Linguistics, volume B, number 71 (PDF), Canberra, A.C.T. 2600.: The Australian National University, page 134
  • Manuel, E. Arsenio (1948) Chinese elements in the Tagalog language: with some indication of Chinese influence on other Philippine languages and cultures and an excursion into Austronesian linguistics, Manila: Filipiniana Publications, page 32