legio

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See also: legíó and legió

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /leːˈɣioː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: le‧gio
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Adjective[edit]

legio ‎(used only predicatively, not comparable)

  1. legion, numerous

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin legiō

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /leˈɡio/
  • Hyphenation: le‧gi‧o

Noun[edit]

legio ‎(accusative singular legion, plural legioj, accusative plural legiojn)

  1. legion

Latin[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From legere

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

legiō f ‎(genitive legiōnis); third declension

  1. (military) A legion.

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative legiō legiōnēs
genitive legiōnis legiōnum
dative legiōnī legiōnibus
accusative legiōnem legiōnēs
ablative legiōne legiōnibus
vocative legiō legiōnēs

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • legio in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • legio in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • LEGIO in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • legio in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to form two legions: efficere duas legiones
    • to fill up the numbers of the legions: complere legiones (B. C. 1. 25)
  • legio in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • legio in William Smith., editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • legio in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • legio in Richard Stillwell et al., editor (1976) The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin legio

Noun[edit]

legio ‎(indeclinable) (uncountable)

  1. legion (adjective)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin legio

Noun[edit]

legio ‎(indeclinable) (uncountable)

  1. legion (adjective)

References[edit]