legio

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See also: legíó and legió

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin legiō, after the story of Legio and the demoniac. The neuter gender in the noun sense “multitude” is influenced by the related term legioen. Doublet of legioen.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈleːɣioː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: le‧gio
  • Rhymes: -eːɣioː

Adjective[edit]

legio (used only predicatively, not comparable)

  1. legion, numerous

Noun[edit]

legio n (plural legio's)

  1. (dated) A multitude, a crowd.
    Onze stad werd geteisterd door legio's ratten.
    Our city was being plagued by multitudes of rats.

Related terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin legiō

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /leˈɡio/
  • Hyphenation: le‧gi‧o

Noun[edit]

legio (accusative singular legion, plural legioj, accusative plural legiojn)

  1. legion

Latin[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From legere, legō (to choose; to collect) +‎ -iō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

legiō f (genitive legiōnis); third declension

  1. (military) A legion.

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative legiō legiōnēs
Genitive legiōnis legiōnum
Dative legiōnī legiōnibus
Accusative legiōnem legiōnēs
Ablative legiōne legiōnibus
Vocative legiō legiōnēs

Meronyms[edit]

  • contubernium (notionally 1600 legio after 107 BC); centuria (notionally 160 legio); manipulus (notionally 130 legio after c. 315 BC); cohors (notionally 110 legio after 107 BC)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • legio in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • legio in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • legio in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • legio in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to form two legions: efficere duas legiones
    • to fill up the numbers of the legions: complere legiones (B. C. 1. 25)
  • legio in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • legio in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • legio in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • legio in Richard Stillwell et al., editor (1976) The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin legio

Noun[edit]

legio (indeclinable) (uncountable)

  1. legion (adjective)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin legio

Noun[edit]

legio (indeclinable) (uncountable)

  1. legion (adjective)

References[edit]