lentes

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lentēs, plural of lēns.

Noun[edit]

lentes (rare)

  1. plural of lens
    • 1670–1710, Isaac Newton, Hydrostatics, Optics, Sound and Heat (MS Add. 3970), lines 1–6, page 353v:
      After many vaine attempts to measure the circles made by coloured rays alone I at last thought of casting colours vpon a white paper, either by a speculum or immediatly by a Prisme which turned about its axis might make all ye colours succed on ye same pt of the paper; Or by casting integrated light on a paper wch might bee varyed into all colours successively by stopping ye rest. Then I laid the lentes so that they wanted 3 or 4 rings depth of touching.
      (Transcription from Richard S. Westfall, communicated by I. B. Cohe, “Isaac Newton’s Coloured Circles twixt two Contiguous Glasses”, received 1964 August 31, in Archive for History of Exact Sciences, volume 2, issue 3, 1965 April 27, page 195.)
    • 1696, Philosophical Transactions, pages 215, 540, 541:
      Afterwards he ſhews how to make a Microſcope or Teleſcope of any two (or more) given ſpecula or lentes, or of a ſpeculum and lens, which ſhall magnifie in any given ratio, and be fitted to any given Eye: Where alſo all the poſſible Combinations of ſpecula and lentes are univerſally coſidered, and the way of reckoning the Power of Catoptrical or Dioptrical or Cata-dioptrical Machines is explained; with the way how to make a ſingle Lens, which ſhall produce the forementioned effects. [] I applied ſome of theſe lentes to a hole in a darkned Room, and found they rendred the Images of Objects with but an indifferent diſtinctneſs. [] I have tried what would be the ſucceſs of Combining Portions of Water by the help of Braſs Rings, and plain pieces of Glaſs, to give them their true Figure and requiſite apertures, and inſerted them at the ends of Tubes of ſevearl lengths; and find, that tho’ theſe natural lentes may ſerve as Eye Glaſſes, yet when uſed as Object ones either to Teliſcopes or double Miſcroſcopes: their Effects will not compenſate the trouble there is in uſing them.
    • 1719, J. T. Desaguliers, “V. A Way for Myopes to uſe Teleſcopes without Eye-Glaſſes, an Object-Glaſs alone becoming as uſeful to them, and ſometimes more than a Combination of Glaſſes”, in Philosophical Transactions. Giving Some Account of the Present Undertakings, Studies, and Labours of the Ingenious, in Many Considerable Parts of the WORLD, number 361, London: Printed for W. Innys, “Lemma 1”, page 1017:
      What is requir’d of a Teleſcope is to give large, and diſtinct Viſion; that is, to make the Object (as in Galileos Teleſcope) or its Iamge (as in the Teleſcopes made up of Convex Lentes) appear under a great Angle, and to have all the Rays of thoſe Pencils that enter the Eye, meet in a point upon the Retina of the Eye, on their reſpective Axes. / The firſt Figure repreſents the Combination of two Convex Lentes for the Aſtronomical or inverting Teleſcope; where the above-mentioned Requiſites are obtain’d. A B is the Object ſuppos’d at a vaſt diſtance from the Ojective Lens L L, ſo that Rays coming from the extremity A of the Object will fall upon the Lens L L, in the ſame manner as if they were parallel to their Axis A X;
    • 1840, Robert Hull, Cursory Notes on the Morbid Eye, London: Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman. Charles Muskett, Norwich, pages 71, 108:
      A child, six months old, was brought to the Infirmary with congenital cataracts, the lentes being the seat of the disorder; the capsules free. The child was very reluctant and vociferous; and as there was no prospect of his ceasing to cry, I introduced the needle to through the sclerotic coat and lacerated a single lens. [] In one, the cornea had been opaque many years and became perfectly pellucid. In the other, both corneæ were entirely opaque, and the crystalline lentes had more opacity than natural—what is their natural opacity?—He continued the sublimate eighteen months with most fortunate success. He states that the constitution can bear this remedy for a long time without any injury.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lentes

  1. feminine plural of lent

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

lentes

  1. Plural form of lente

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lentes

  1. feminine plural of lent

Galician[edit]

Noun[edit]

lentes f pl

  1. plural of lente
  2. glasses, spectacles

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

lentēs

  1. second-person singular present active subjunctive of lentō

Norman[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lentes f pl

  1. feminine plural of lent

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lentes

  1. plural of lente

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈlentes/, [ˈlẽn̪.t̪es]

Noun[edit]

lentes m pl (plural only)

  1. eyeglasses
    Synonyms: anteojos, gafas
  2. plural of lente