meed

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English meede, mede, from Old English mēd, meord, meard, meorþ(meed, reward, pay, price, compensation, bribe), from Proto-Germanic *mēzdō, *mizdō(meed), from Proto-Indo-European *misdʰ-(to pay). Cognate with obsolete Dutch miede(wages), Low German mede(payment, wages, reward), German Miete(rent), Gothic 𐌼𐌹𐌶𐌳𐍉(mizdō, meed, reward, payment, recompense), Greek μισθός(misthós, wage), Old Church Slavonic мьзда(mьzda, reward).

Noun[edit]

meed ‎(plural meeds)

  1. (now literary, archaic) A payment or recompense made for services rendered or in recognition of some achievement; reward, deserts; award.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.i:
      For well she wist, as true it was indeed, / That her liues Lord and patrone of her health / Right well deserued as his duefull meed, / Her loue, her seruice, and her vtmost wealth.
    • 1829, Andrew Jackson, First Annual Message to Congress:
      Public gratitude, therefore, stamps her seal upon it, and the meed should not be withheld which may here after operate as a stimulus to our gallant tars.
    • 1880, translation by Richard Francis Burton of Os Lusiadas, Canto IX, stanza 93 by Luís de Camões
      Better to merit and the meed to miss,
      than, lacking merit, every meed possess.
  2. A gift; bribe.
  3. (dated) Merit or desert; worth.
Quotations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English meden, from Old English *mēdian(to reward, bribe), from Proto-Germanic *mizdōną(to meed), from Proto-Indo-European *mizdʰ-(to pay). Cognate with Middle Low German mēden(to reward), German mieten(to reward).

Verb[edit]

meed ‎(third-person singular simple present meeds, present participle meeding, simple past and past participle meeded)

  1. (transitive) To reward; bribe.
  2. (transitive) To deserve; merit.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

meed

  1. singular past indicative of mijden

Anagrams[edit]


Plautdietsch[edit]

Adjective[edit]

meed

  1. tired, fagged
    hee wia sea meed
    he was very tired

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