moch

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See also: Moch, mốch, and moc'h

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish moch (early).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

moch (genitive singular masculine moch, genitive singular feminine moiche, plural mocha, comparative moiche)

  1. early
    Synonym: luath

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
moch mhoch not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Proto-Brythonic *mox (soon, early), from Proto-Celtic *moxs, from Proto-Indo-European *moḱs, whence also Sanskrit मक्षू (makṣū, fast; early), Avestan 𐬨𐬊𐬱𐬎(mošu, soon, quickly), Latin mox (soon). Doublet of mos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

moch

  1. early

Declension[edit]

o/ā-stem
Singular Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative moch moch moch
Vocative muich*
moch**
Accusative moch muich
Genitive muich muiche muich
Dative much muich much
Plural Masculine Feminine/neuter
Nominative muich mocha
Vocative muchu
mocha
Accusative muchu
mocha
Genitive moch
Dative mochaib
Notes *modifying a noun whose vocative is different from its nominative

**modifying a noun whose vocative is identical to its nominative
† not when substantivized

Related terms[edit]

  • mos (soon)

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: moch
  • Manx: mogh
  • Scottish Gaelic: moch

Adverb[edit]

moch

  1. early, betimes

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
moch
also mmoch after a proclitic
moch
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From truncation of Moskal +‎ -ch.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /mɔx/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔx
  • Syllabification: moch

Noun[edit]

moch m pers

  1. (slang) a Russian person

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stankiewicz, Edward (1986) The Slavic Languages: Unity in Diversity[1], page 263

Further reading[edit]

  • moch in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • moch in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish moch (early; betimes).

Adjective[edit]

moch

  1. early

Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

moch

  1. early, betimes, soon

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
moch mhoch
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “moch”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “moch”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Upper Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *mъxъ.

Noun[edit]

moch m

  1. moss

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • moch” in Soblex

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *mox (pig), from Proto-Celtic *mokkus.

Noun[edit]

moch m pl (singulative mochyn)

  1. pigs, swine, hogs
    1. (figuratively) greedy, dirty, lazy, drunk, or immoral persons
  2. (mining) small pumps used underground in coal mines to remove water
  3. crushers (in quarrying)
  4. ridging-ploughs
  5. segments (of orange, etc.)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Welsh moch, from Proto-Brythonic *mox (early, soon), from Proto-Celtic *moxs, from Proto-Indo-European *moḱs, whence also Sanskrit मक्षू (makṣū, fast; early), Avestan 𐬨𐬊𐬱𐬎(mošu, soon, quickly), Latin mox (soon).

Adverb[edit]

moch

  1. (obsolete) soon, early

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
moch foch unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “moch”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies