natron

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See also: Natron and natrón

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From French natron, from Arabic نَطْرُون(naṭrūn), from Ancient Greek νίτρον(nítron, nitre).

Drew Griffith writes that Nitron ultimately derived from the Egyptian term for sodium bicarbonate:

  • Egyptian 'ntry'... is... derived from ntr, 'god". The Egyptians called carbonate of soda this as a kenning (the vox propsia being hsmn) because it is divine. Sodium carbonate is divine.... as immortal and immutable - in at least two of its uses : in metalurgy and in embalming. ... This capacity to preserve bodies from decay accounts, according to Plutarch, for the traditional idea that salt is divine... I suggest that the same word [Nitron] had been borrowed much earlier, during the Mycenaen period, when greece was under constant, if distant, Egyptian influence that included the knowledge of mummification-technology. At that time, the word in Egyptian had its old pronunciation. It was borrowed, perhaps through a semitic intermediary, as netkr with the tk representing the single original consonant t just as the kt in daktilos, date represents the single consonant q in the original semitic dql.

He concludes that when the Egyptians later had more contact with the Egyptians, the Egyptian language had developed so that the K was no longer heard and Natron (ntry) came into Greek as Nitron.

References Nektar and Nitron, Griffith, R Drew. Glotta 72.1 (Jan 1, 1994): 20. http://electronicsandbooks.com/eab1/manual/Magazine/G/Glotta%20DE/Glotta,%2072%201-4%20(1994).pdf

Noun[edit]

natron ‎(uncountable)

  1. (mineralogy) A crystalline mixture of hydrous sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate, with the chemical formula Na2CO3·10H2O.
    • 1974, Lawrence Durrell, Monsieur, Faber & Faber 1992, p. 242:
      You know the mysterious idols they were supposed to set up to worship in their chapters – were they really human heads treated with natron after the Ancient Egyptian pattern – idols of Persian or Syrian provenance?

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

natron c (singular definite natronen, not used in plural form)

  1. (chemistry) sodium hydrogen carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, NaHCO3.
  2. (chemistry, obsolete) sodium hydroxide, NaOH.

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish natrón from Arabic نَطْرُون(naṭrūn), from Ancient Greek νίτρον(nítron, nitre).

Noun[edit]

natron m ‎(uncountable)

  1. natron

External links[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek νίτρον(nítron, nitre), via Arabic نَطْرُون(naṭrūn)

Noun[edit]

natron n ‎(definite singular natronet)

  1. baking soda, bicarbonate of soda, sodium bicarbonate

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek νίτρον(nítron, nitre), via Arabic نَطْرُون(naṭrūn)

Noun[edit]

natron n ‎(definite singular natronet)

  1. baking soda, bicarbonate of soda, sodium bicarbonate

References[edit]