noblesse

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See also: Noblesse

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English noblesse, from Anglo-Norman noblesse, noblesce et al., Old French noblace, nobleche et al., from noble (noble).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

noblesse (usually uncountable, plural noblesses)

  1. The quality of being noble; nobleness.
    • c. 1395, Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Clerk's Tale’, The Canterbury Tales, Ellesmere ms:
      I yow took/ out of youre pouere array / And putte yow / in estaat of heigh noblesse.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter x, in Le Morte Darthur, book XIX:
      his moder had discouerd in her pryde / how she had wroughte that by enchauntement / soo that he shold neuer be hole vntyl the best knyghte of the world had serched his woundes / [] / And yf I fayle to hele hym here in this land I wylle neuer take more payne vpon me / and that is pyte for he was a good knyghte and of grete noblenes
    • 1612, Ben Jonson, Epigrams
      But thou , whose noblesse keeps one stature still
  2. The nobility; peerage.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French, see noble +‎ -esse

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /nɔ.blɛs/
  • Rhymes: -ɛs
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

noblesse f (plural noblesses)

  1. nobility

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman noblesse, noblesce et al., Old French noblace, nobleche et al., from noble (noble).

Noun[edit]

noblesse (uncountable)

  1. noblesse
    • 1470–1483 (date produced), [Thomas Malory], [Le Morte Darthur] (British Library Additional Manuscript 59678), [England: s.n.], folio 35, recto, lines 30–32:
      That is to me ſeyde kyng lodegreaūs the beſte tydyngꝭ that eu[er] I herde · that ſo worthy a kyng of proveſſe ⁊ nobleſſe wol wedde my dought[er] ·
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Descendants[edit]

  • English: noblesse