ocus

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Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *onkus-tus, from Proto-Celtic *onkus(near).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ocus ‎(comparative oicsiu, superlative oicsi)

  1. near
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 138a2, 3
      écndairc cian ... ecṅdairc ocus
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
      (gl. personae absenti vel quasi absenti; lit. "absent near", i.e. though present regarded as absent)
  2. close (of a relationship)
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 9c32
      is acus a coibdelag
      near is their kinship
    • The Martyrology of Óengus the Culdee
      is ocus ar cundu
      close is our friendship

Usage notes[edit]

Often followed by preposition do.

Inflection[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ocus

  1. and

Descendants[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ocus m ‎(genitive oicse, nominative plural oicsi)

  1. nearness, proximity
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 23b41
      imb i céin fa i n-accus beo-sa
      whether I be far or near

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

References[edit]

  • 1 ocus, acus” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • 2 ocus” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.