pathic

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See also: -pathic

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pathicus, from Ancient Greek παθικός (pathikós), from πάθος (páthos, suffering, feeling), from πάσχω (páskhō, I feel, I suffer).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pathic (plural pathics)

  1. (now literary) Synonym of bottom: a passive male partner in homosexual anal intercourse.
    • 1810, Lord Byron, letter (to Henry Drury), 3 May 1810:
      In England the vices in fashion are whoring & drinking, in Turkey, Sodomy & smoking, we prefer a girl and a bottle, they a pipe and pathic.
    • 1959: William Burroughs, Naked Lunch
      And enough of these gooey saints with a look of pathic dismay as if they getting fucked up the ass and try not to pay any mind.
    • 1975: Robertson Davies, World of Wonders
      But in those days I was Paul Dempster, who had been made to forget it and take a name from the side of a barn, and be the pathic of a perverted drug-taker.
    • 1976: Robert Nye, Falstaff
      Clermont (known to his friends as Cordelia) was a nancy, a pathic, a male varlet, a masculine whore.

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pathic (comparative more pathic, superlative most pathic)

  1. Passive; suffering.
  2. Relating to disease.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]