piper

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See also: Piper

English[edit]

piper (playing bagpipes)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English piper, pipere; equivalent to pipe +‎ -er.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

piper (plural pipers)

  1. A musician who plays a pipe.
  2. A bagpiper.
  3. A baby pigeon.
  4. A common European gurnard (Trigla lyra), having a large head, with prominent nasal projection, and with large, sharp, opercular spines.
  5. A sea urchin (Goniocidaris hystrix) with very long spines, native to the American and European coasts.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Latin

Noun[edit]

piper

  1. Archaic form of pepper.

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Greek πιπέρι (pipéri), from Ancient Greek πέπερι (péperi).

Noun[edit]

piper m

  1. pepper (plant)
  2. pepper (spice)

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

piper (pepper)

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek πέπερι (péperi, pepper), via Middle Persian from an Indo-Aryan source; compare Sanskrit पिप्पलि (pippali, long pepper).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

piper n (genitive piperis); third declension

  1. pepper

Declension[edit]

Third declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative piper pipera
Genitive piperis piperum
Dative piperī piperibus
Accusative piper pipera
Ablative pipere piperibus
Vocative piper pipera

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • piper in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • piper in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • piper in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • piper in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • piper in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English pipor.

Noun[edit]

piper

  1. Alternative form of peper

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English pīpere; equivalent to pipe +‎ -er; compare Old Norse pípari and Old High German pfīfari.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

piper (plural pipers)

  1. A piper; one who plays a pipe.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Norman[edit]

Verb[edit]

piper

  1. (Jersey, onomatopoeia) to peep

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

piper m or f

  1. indefinite plural of pipe

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

piper f

  1. indefinite plural of pipe

Old English[edit]

Noun[edit]

piper m

  1. Alternative form of pipor

Romanian[edit]

piper

Etymology[edit]

From Slavic piperĭ, Greek πιπέρι (pipéri), from Ancient Greek πέπερι (péperi).

Noun[edit]

piper m

  1. pepper (plant)
  2. pepper (spice)

See also[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

piper

  1. present tense of pipa.

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

piper c (plural pipers, diminutive piperke)

  1. pepper (spice)

Further reading[edit]

  • piper”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011