politic

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See also: polític

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French politique, from Latin politicus, from Ancient Greek πολιτικός (politikós), from πολίτης (polítēs, citizen). Cognate with German politisch (political). Doublet of politico.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

politic (comparative more politic, superlative most politic)

  1. (archaic) Of or relating to polity, or civil government; political.
    the body politic
    • 1593, Sir Philip Sidney, The Countesse of Pembrokes Arcadia:
      [] he with his people made all but one politic body whereof himself was the head
  2. (archaic, of things) Relating to, or promoting, a policy, especially a national policy; well-devised; adapted to its end, whether right or wrong.
    a politic treaty
  3. (archaic) Sagacious in promoting a policy; ingenious in devising and advancing a system of management; devoted to a scheme or system rather than to a principle; hence, in a good sense, wise; prudent; sagacious
  4. Shrewd, prudent and expedient.
  5. Discreet and diplomatic.
    • 1834, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Francesca Carrara, volume 3, page 25:
      A unanimous exclamation called upon Evelyn himself to speak; and, after a minute's politic pause, he went on to state his plan.
    • 1915, T. S. Eliot, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”, in Prufrock and Other Observations, published 1917:
      Deferential, glad to be of use, / Politic, cautious, and meticulous;
  6. Artful, crafty or cunning.

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

politic (plural politics)

  1. (archaic) A politician.
    • 1625, Francis [Bacon], “Of the True Greatness of Kingdoms and Estates”, in The Essayes [], 3rd edition, London: [] Iohn Haviland for Hanna Barret, OCLC 863521290:
      to speake truly of politikes & Statesmen
    • 1848, James Russell Lowell, The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell, Epigrams, 3:
      Swiftly the politic goes; is it dark? he borrows a lantern; / Slowly the statesman and sure, guiding his feet by the stars.
    • 1871, Benjamin Jowett, Plato: The Republic Chapter III
      And therefore our politic Asclepius may be supposed to have exhibited the power of his art only to persons who... had a definite ailment.

Verb[edit]

politic (third-person singular simple present politics, present participle politicking, simple past and past participle politicked)

  1. To engage in political activity; politick.
    • 2002, Dana Stabenow, A Fine and Bitter Snow, →ISBN, page 206:
      That why you turned the Kanuyaq Land Trust into the IRS for using donations to politic instead of to buy land?
    • 2009, Scott N. Brooks, Black Men Can't Shoot, →ISBN, page 169:
      His brother [Anthony], he politicked him so well, that even his [Jason's] attitude, all the scouts got away from [forgot about] his [bad] attitude because he was a good player.
    • 2017, John Hayman, Bitter Harvest: Richmond Flowers and the Civil Rights Revolution, →ISBN:
      He made errors, and they should have reversed him, but he politicked the thing through.

Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

politic (comparative plus politic, superlative le plus politic)

  1. political

Ladin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

politic m pl

  1. plural of politich

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin polīticus, from Ancient Greek πολιτικός (politikós).

Adjective[edit]

politic m (feminine singular politica, masculine plural politics, feminine plural politicas)

  1. political

Derived terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin politicus or French politique.

Adjective[edit]

politic m or n (feminine singular politică, masculine plural politici, feminine and neuter plural politice)

  1. political

Declension[edit]