stirna

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See also: stirnā

Latvian[edit]

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 stirna on Latvian Wikipedia
Stirna

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *śírˀnāˀ, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱr̥h₂-néh₂, from *ḱerh₂- (head, top, horn), with an extra -n (from which also German Horn, English horn, Latin cornū and also cervus (deer)), which yielded Latvian archaic sirna. The presence of a t has given rise to various explanations: st- < *ts-; metathesis (sirna > *srina) with t epenthesis; contamination or influence from some other animal name, e.g., taurs; borrowing from a Slavic language with changes to conform to Baltic pronunciation. More recently, it has been suggested that stirna might come from Proto-Indo-European *ser- (red, pink) in the reduced grade *sr̥-no-, causing t epenthesis in Baltic. Cognates include Lithuanian stìrna, Old Prussian sirwis, Proto-Slavic *sьrna.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

stirna f (4th declension)

  1. roe deer (Capreolus capreolus)
    stirnu āzis, stirnuāzis, stirnāzismale roe deer
    stirnu buksmale roe deer
    stirnu kaza, mātītefemale roe deer
    stirnu mazulisbaby roe deer, fawn (syn. stirnēns)
    stirnas pašlaik aizliegts medītroe deer hunting is now prohibited
    meitene viegla kā stirnaa girl as light as a roe deer

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns. 1992, 2001. Latviešu etimoloģijas vārdnīca. Rīga: AVOTS. →ISBN.

Lithuanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *śírˀnāˀ, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱr̥h₂-néh₂, from *ḱerh₂- (head, top, horn), with an extra -n (from which also German Horn, English horn, Latin cornū and also cervus (deer)). More recently, it has been suggested that stirna might come from Proto-Indo-European *ser- (red, pink) in the reduced grade *sr̥-no-, causing t epenthesis in Baltic. Cognates include stirna, Old Prussian sirwis, Proto-Slavic *sьrna.

Noun[edit]

stìrna f stress pattern 1

  1. roe

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *stirniju.

Noun[edit]

stirna m

  1. forehead

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle High German: stirne