vail

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See also: Vail

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French vail, from valoir (to be worth), from Latin valeō (I am worth).

Noun[edit]

vail (plural vails)

  1. (obsolete) Profit; return; proceeds.
  2. (chiefly in the plural, obsolete) Money given to servants by visitors; a gratuity; also vale.
    • 1696, John Dryden, The Husband His Own Cuckold, London: J. Tonson, Act I, Scene 1, p. 9,[2]
      Do you remember, how many Rich Gowns and Petticoats, how many lac’d Pinners, Hoods, Scarfs, and Nightrails, I have given you, since the three Years you have serv’d me, together with many other Vails, Perquisites, and Profits you have enjoy’d in my Service?
    • 1742, Henry Fielding, Joseph Andrews, London: Harrison & Co., 1780, Volume I, Book 2, Chapter 16, p. 91,[3]
      [] it is a maxim among the gentlemen of our cloth, that those masters who promise the most, perform the least; and I have often heard them say, they have found the largest vails in those families where they were not promised any.

Etymology 2[edit]

Aphetic form of avale

Noun[edit]

vail (plural vails)

  1. (obsolete) submission

Verb[edit]

vail (third-person singular simple present vails, present participle vailing, simple past and past participle vailed)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To pay homage, bow, submit, defer (to someone or something); to yield, give way (to something).
    • 1590, Christopher Marlowe, Tamburlaine, London, Act I, Scene 2,[4]
      [] Christian Merchants that with Russian stems
      Plow vp huge furrowes in the Caspian sea.
      Shall vaile to vs, as Lords of all the Lake.
    • 1608, William Shakespeare, Pericles, Act IV, Prologue,[5]
      She would with rich and constant pen
      Vail to her mistress Dian;
    • 1690, John Locke, An Essay concerning Human Understanding, London: Thomas Basset, Book 4, Chapter 17, p. 346,[6]
      [] when a Man does not readily vail to the Opinions of approved Authors, which have been received with respect and submission by others
    • 1692, Robert South, Discourses on Various Subjects and Occasions, Boston: Bowles & Dearborn, 1827, Discourse 5, p. 370,[7]
      Thy convenience must vail to thy neighbour’s necessity.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To remove as a sign of deference, as a hat.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1, Act V, Scene 3,[8]
      [] Now the time is come
      That France must vail her lofty-plumed crest
      And let her head fall into England’s lap.
    • 1820, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe, Chapter 5,[9]
      [] the Templar [] , without vailing his bonnet, or testifying any reverence for the alleged sanctity of the relic, took from his neck a gold chain, which he flung on the board []
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To lower, let fall; to allow or cause to sink.

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

vail (plural vails)

  1. Archaic form of veil.

Verb[edit]

vail (third-person singular simple present vails, present participle vailing, simple past and past participle vailed)

  1. Archaic form of veil.

Anagrams[edit]