vila

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See also: víla and vil’ă

English[edit]

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Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Serbo-Croatian vila, Slovene vila.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vila ‎(plural vilas or vile)

  1. (mythology) A type of fairy or nymph in Slavic mythology.
    • 1874, Elodie Lawton Mijatovic, Serbian Folklore:
      "The Vilas (fairies) live there, and they will certainly put out your eyes as they have put out mine, if you venture on their mountain."
    • 1998, Mike Dixon-Kennedy, Encyclopedia of Russian and Slavic Myth and Legend, page 302:
      Duly married, the couple lived for some time in peace and contentment, until one day Marko boasted that his wife was a vila, whereupon she put on her wings and flew away.
    • 1995, Albert Bates Lord, The Singer Resumes the Tale, page 52:
      She is answered, fittingly enough, by a vila, who declares that she is more beautiful than the girl.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

vila f ‎(plural viles)

  1. Settlement, usually with a minimum of five thousand inhabitants (bigger than a town but smaller that a city), that has asked for the title officially. Previously, this title was granted by the king.

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vila f

  1. villa

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • vila in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • vila in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vīlla ‎(country house).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vila f ‎(plural vilas)

  1. village; a small town

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Provençal[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vilanus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vila m ‎(oblique plural vilas, nominative singular vilas, nominative plural vila)

  1. serf, countryman, peasant
    • c. 1130, Marcabru, pastorela:
      Cerca fols la folatura, / Cortes cortez’ aventura, / E·l vilas ab la vilana [...].
      The fool searches for folly, the gentleman for gentle adventure, and the peasant for his peasant-girl.

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pt

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese vila ‎(village), from Latin villa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vila f (plural vilas)

  1. town, village
  2. (Brazil, slang) a low-class residential area

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *acucŭla, *acucla, diminutive of Latin ăcus ‎(needle).

Noun[edit]

vila f (plural vilas)

  1. (Sutsilvan) needle

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *vila. Cognate with Bulgarian самовила ‎(samovila) and вила ‎(vila, fairy), Slovene vila ‎(fairy living in the forest or in the water), Old Russian вила ‎(vila) and Slovak víla ‎(fairy). According to Vasmer, non-Slavic cognates include Old Norse veiðr ‎(hunt) and Avestan [script needed] ‎(vayeiti, he pursuits, frightens)>.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʋǐːla/
  • Hyphenation: vi‧la

Noun[edit]

víla f (Cyrillic spelling ви́ла)

  1. fairy
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin villa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʋîla/
  • Hyphenation: vi‧la

Noun[edit]

vȉla f (Cyrillic spelling ви̏ла)

  1. villa
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • вила in Max Vasmer (1986), Etimologičeskij slovarʹ russkogo jazyka [Etymological Dictionary of the Russian Language], in 4 vols (second edition), Moscow: Progress — Translated from German and supplemented by O. N. Trubačóv

Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • hvila (obsolete since 1906)

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hvíld ‎(rest, pause), compare Danish hvile ‎(rest), Old High German wīla (German Weile), Gothic 𐍈𐌴𐌹𐌻𐌰 ‎(ƕeila, interval, time period), English while.

Noun[edit]

vila c

  1. a rest; relief from work, activity or exertion
  2. a rest; the repose afforded by death
  3. (physics) a rest; absence of motion
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse hvíla, from Proto-Germanic *hwīlaną, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷyeh₁-.

Verb[edit]

vila

  1. to rest; to relieve, to give rest to
  2. to rest; to take a break; to cease working for a little while, to become inactive
  3. to rest; to lean or lay
  4. to rest; to lie or lean or be supported
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin villa; compare Italian villa

Noun[edit]

Venetian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia vec

vila f (plural vile)

  1. house (large), mansion