valise

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English[edit]

a valise previously carried by US President Gerald Ford

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French valise.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /vəˈliːz/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːz

Noun[edit]

valise (plural valises)

  1. A piece of hand luggage such as a suitcase or travelling bag.
    • 1842, [anonymous collaborator of Letitia Elizabeth Landon], chapter LII, in Lady Anne Granard; or, Keeping up Appearances. [], volume III, London: Henry Colburn, [], →OCLC, page 40:
      Finding upon the corpse more money than was required for the funeral, he transmitted it to the abbess, together with a small valise, containing, besides apparel, some trifling articles of jewellery, and the bracelet transmitted to you,...
    • 1849 May – 1850 November, Charles Dickens, The Personal History of David Copperfield, London: Bradbury & Evans, [], published 1850, →OCLC:
      Though he studiously concealed his hand, this morning before breakfast, in writing the direction-card which he attached to the little brown valise of happier days, the eagle-glance of matrimonial anxiety detected, d, o, n, distinctly traced.
    • 1872 September – 1873 July, Thomas Hardy, “‘XXIII’”, in A Pair of Blue Eyes. [], volumes (please specify |volume=I to III), London: Tinsley Brothers, [], published 1873, →OCLC:
      In spite of the falling rain, which had somewhat lessened, he took a small valise in his hand, and, leaving the remainder of his luggage at the inn, ascended the hills towards East Endelstow.
    • 2024, “Nothing to Declare”, in Loss of Life, performed by MGMT:
      Nothing to declare / Not in the valise of my mind

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Middle French valise, from Medieval Latin valesia, valixia, from Late Latin valisia, possibly from Gaulish *valisia (leather bag), from Proto-Celtic *val- (to enclose, surround), from Proto-Indo-European *welH-.[1] Or, possibly from Arabicوَلِيهَة(walīha, large bag).[2]

Maybe a borrowing through Italian valigia, even though this is dubious. Compare Spanish valija.[3]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

valise f (plural valises)

  1. case, suitcase

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  1. ^ valise”, in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th edition, Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016, →ISBN.
  2. ^ Roberts, Edward A. (2014) A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Spanish Language with Families of Words based on Indo-European Roots, Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN
  3. ^ http://nq.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/issue_pdf/frontmatter_pdf/s9-X/247.pdf

Anagrams[edit]

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French valise.

Pronunciation[edit]

 

Noun[edit]

valise f (plural valises)

  1. a small suitcase
    Synonym: maleta