whank

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

whank (plural whanks)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) A strike with the fist; a blow; a knock.
    A whank at the door.
  2. (Scotland, Northern England) A large portion, slice or lump.

Verb[edit]

whank (third-person singular simple present whanks, present participle whanking, simple past and past participle whanked)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) To beat; to thrash; to whip; to lash.
  2. (Scotland, Northern England) To cut, especially to cut off a large portion.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

whank (plural whanks)

  1. A strike with the fist; a blow; a knock.
  2. A large portion, slice or lump.
    • 1915, Beattie, David Johnstone, Oor Gate En':
      The toodies were being screwed oot o' a big whank o' dough.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1925, Smith, Elliot Cowan, Mang Howes an Knowes[2]:
      It serrd naething for ti stert simmereen an wuntereen, for it's ill speakin atween a fowe man an a fastin; bit A bocht an ett twae cookies an a whank o cheese ti keep iz gaun till A wan ti Jethart.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Verb[edit]

whank (third-person singular present whanks, present participle whankin, past whankit, past participle whankit)

  1. To beat; to thrash; to whip; to lash.
    • 1807, Ruickbie, James, “Epistle to Mr. J___ Y___, Merchant”, in The Way-Side Cottager, page 175:
      But tho' I get my hurdies whankit, / An' wi' the hare-brain'd core be rankit
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1864, Latto, William Duncan, Tammas Bodkin: Or, The Humours of a Scottish Tailor[3], page 375:
      Straucht across the rig frae fur to fur I walkit, whankin' doon whatever opposed my progress—corn, thristles, carl-doddies, broom-cowes—every green herb, in short, an' ilka time I cam' oot o' the corn I brocht nae less than a sheaf in my oxter []
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. To cut, especially to cut off a large portion.
    • 1864, Latto, William Duncan, Tammas Bodkin: Or, The Humours of a Scottish Tailor[4], page 68:
      My faither had nae patience to lowse the raips frae the parcel, but sent me up for the sheers, wherewith he whankit them aff, juist as if they had been a wheen beasin' steeks, greatly to my mither's horification, wha said it was "sae wasterfulike."
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

References[edit]