Jean

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See also: jean

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a Middle English feminine form of John, from Old French Jehane; sometimes considered Scottish.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jean

  1. A female given name.
    • 1788 Robert Burns, Of A' the Airts the Wind Can Blaw:
      There's not a bonnie flower that springs / By fountain, shaw, or green, / There's not a bonnie bird that sings / But minds me o' my Jean.
    • 1866 Louisa May Alcott, Behind a Mask, or a Woman's Power, Chapter II
      - - - Isn't Jean a pretty name?" "Not bad; but why don't you call her Miss Muir?" "She begged me not. She hates it, and loves to be called Jean, alone."
    • 1972 Anne Tyler, The Clock Winder, Knopf, 1972, page 67
      He was trying to think of her name; she had come to cook him dinner twice last spring. - - - Jean, maybe. Or Betty. One of these plain names.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French Jehan, from Latin Iohannes, from Ancient Greek Ἰωάννης (Iōannēs), from Hebrew יוחנן (Yôḥānān, Yahweh is gracious).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jean

  1. John (biblical character).
  2. A male given name, traditionally very popular in France, also common as the first part of hyphenated given names.

Related terms[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Jean m

  1. A male given name, equivalent to French Jean and English John.
  2. John (biblical character).

Derived terms[edit]


Limburgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French

Noun[edit]

Jean m

  1. A male given name.

Inflection[edit]

Inflection
Root singular Root plural Diminutive singular Diminutive plural
Nominative Jean Jeane Jeanke Jeankes
Genitive Jeans Jeane Jeankes Jeankes
Locative Jeanese Jeaneser Jeaneske Jeaneskes
Dative* Jeanem Jeanemer Jeanemske Jeanemskes
Accusative* Jean Jeane Jeanke Jeankes
  • The dative and accusative are obsolete nowadays, use the nominative instead.

See also[edit]