User:大始王皇

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My primary activity here will be adding the Wu pronounciation for Chinese characters, in IPA, latin alphabet, and Zhuyin Fuhao. Also if i have time i might add Zhuyin Fuhao for mandarin too.


[i] - a sound between English eat ad it
AFAIK, eat is pronounced exactly as /iːt/ in RP.
[y] - a vowel not easy for English speakers
The “French ‘u’”, identical to the long pronunciation of the German Ü/ü (umlauted ‘u’), as in über-.
[ɪ] - as in English it
Agreed.
[ɥ] - I don't know this one
The labialised version of [j]; i.e., like the English consonant ‘y’ (as in yet: /jɛt/), but with the lips rounded as with ‘w’ ([w]).
Indeed. If it helps, i:j::u:w::y:ɥ. (It's the <u> in French lui, cuir.) —RuakhTALK 14:53, 6 December 2008 (UTC)
[e] - depending on English dialect as in bet, but English doesn't really distinguish between [e] and [ɛ].
The first vowel in the diphthong in late (pronounced /leɪt/); identical to the French É/é.
[ø] - a vowel not easy for English speakers
Per the Scandinavian Ø/ø and the German Ö/ö, as in Søren Kierkegaard and Möbius strip.
[ɛ] - depending on English dialect as in bet, but English doesn't really distinguish between [e] and [ɛ].
Hippietrail is right; the sound is identical to the French È/è.
[ə] - as in English the
That is somewhat ambiguous, because the can be pronounced as /ðə/ or /ði/. This is the sound of the wholly-unstressed forms of English’s ‘a’, ‘e’, and ‘u’ (though [ʌ] is also common for an unstressed ‘u’); e.g., about (/əˈbaʊt/), beaten (/ˈiːtən/), and but (/bət/).
[ɐ] - for English speakers, this would be hard to distiniguish from [ə].
This is the pronunciation of the German syllabic ‘r’, as in the final ‘-er’ of zeitgeister, poltergeister, and Zweihänder.
[a] - for English speakers, maybe hard to distingish from [ɑ].
In RP, the first vowel in the emboldened diphthongs of allow (/əˈlaʊ/) and light (/laɪt/). Many dialects pronounce and as /and/; however, it is pronounced as /ænd/ in RP. IMO, the confusion can arrise between <a> and <æ>, but not between <a> and <ɑ>.
[ɑ] - as in English father, but for English speakers, maybe hard to distingish from [a].
Correct, but the distinction should not be difficult for speakers of English.
[ɔ] - as in English bought, for British or Australian English speakers also as in English port
More like bought; also, in RP, the first vowel of the emboldened diphthong of boy (/bɔɪ/).
[ɤ] - a difficult sound for English speakers
If you look at the Vowels chart of this page, you’ll see that the <ɤ> sound is somewhere between <ʊ>, <o>, and <ʌ>.
[o] - for American English speakers as in hot
I thought Americans pronounced hot as /hɑt/… In American English, /o/ is the first vowel of the emboldened diphthongs of boat (/boʊt/; RP: /bəʊt/) and join (/ʤoɪn/; RP: /ʤɔɪn/).
[ʊ] - as in English put, but American English speakers may pronounce this more like [ə].
In RP, put is indeed pronounced as /pʊt/. This is the sound for the English “short ‘u’” (o͝o); contrast <u>.
[u] - a shorter version of the sound in English news
News is pronounced as /njuz/ in RP. Think of the o͞o sound of the word shoot.
[b] - as in English
[d] - as in English
[g] - as in English
[ɦ] - I don't know this sound.
Per the ‘h’ of the Czech pronunciation of the word háček (/ˈɦaːʧɛk/). This is the murmured form of <h>, kinda like the English ‘h’, but “breathier”… (Sorry to be vague!)
[z] - as in English
[v] - as in English
[ʥ] - as in English jump
Not strictly correct (the sound of the ‘j’ in jump is most accurately repræsented by <ʤ>: /ʤəmp/); see <ʑ>.
[ʑ] - as in English measure
Measure is, strictly speaking, pronounced as /ˈmɛʒəː/ (or as /ˈmɛzjʊə/, but the latter sounds very unnatural), but, nevertheless, it is the closest sound to [ʑ] in English; it’s meant to be pronounced as a co-articulation of [z] and [ʝ], but, as Hippietrail notes, that essentially renders [ʒ].
hippietrail 00:22, 3 December 2008 (UTC)
 (u):Raifʻhār (t):Doremítzwr﴿ 19:29, 3 December 2008 (UTC)