anker

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See also: Anker

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

anker (plural ankers)

  1. (obsolete) a measure of wine or spirit equal to 10 gallons; a barrel of this capacity

References[edit]

  • OED 2nd edition 1989

Anagrams[edit]


Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

anker

  1. beast

Adjective[edit]

anker

  1. mean

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse akkeri, from Latin ancora (anchor).

Noun[edit]

anker n (singular definite ankret or ankeret, plural indefinite ankre)

  1. (nautical) anchor
  2. armature, anchor (rotating part of an electric motor or dynamo)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From German Anker or Dutch anker, from Medieval Latin anceria, ancheria (a small vat).

Noun[edit]

anker n (singular definite ankret or ankeret, plural indefinite ankre)

  1. barrel (beer), cask (wine)
  2. anker
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See anke

Noun[edit]

anker c

  1. plural indefinite of anke

Verb[edit]

anker

  1. present tense of anke

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anker n (plural ankers, diminutive ankertje n)

  1. anchor

Verb[edit]

anker

  1. first-person singular present indicative of ankeren
  2. imperative of ankeren

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Verb[edit]

anker

  1. First-person singular present of ankern.
  2. Imperative singular of ankern.

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

anker (plural ankeres)

  1. Anchor

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ankurô, whence also Old English ancor, Old Norse akkeri, from Latin ancora

Noun[edit]

anker m

  1. anchor

Descendants[edit]