exempt

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French exempt, from Latin exemptus, past participle of eximō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzɛmpt/, /ɛɡˈzɛm(p)t/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛmpt
  • Hyphenation: ex‧empt

Adjective[edit]

exempt (not comparable)

  1. Free from a duty or obligation.
    In their country all women are exempt from military service.
    His income is so small that it is exempt from tax.
    • Dryden
      'Tis laid on all, not any one exempt.
  2. (of an employee or his position) Not entitled to overtime pay when working overtime.
  3. (obsolete) Cut off; set apart.
    • Shakespeare
      corrupted, and exempt from ancient gentry
  4. (obsolete) Extraordinary; exceptional.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chapman to this entry?)

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

exempt (plural exempts)

  1. One who has been released from something.
  2. (historical) A type of French police officer.
    • 1840, William Makepeace Thackeray, ‘Cartouche’, The Paris Sketch Book:
      with this he slipped through the exempts quite unsuspected, and bade adieu to the Lazarists and his honest father […].
  3. (UK) One of four officers of the Yeomen of the Royal Guard, having the rank of corporal; an exon.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

exempt (third-person singular simple present exempts, present participle exempting, simple past and past participle exempted)

  1. (transitive) To grant (someone) freedom or immunity from.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin exemptus, past participle of eximō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

exempt m (feminine exempte, masculine plural exempts, feminine plural exemptes)

  1. exempt

Noun[edit]

exempt m (plural exempts)

  1. exempt, (type of) policeman
    • 1844, Alexandre Dumas, Les Trois Mousquetaires, XIII:
      « Suivez-moi, dit un exempt qui venait à la suite des gardes.

External links[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin exemptus, past participle of eximō.

Adjective[edit]

exempt m (feminine singular exempte, masculine plural exempts, feminine plural exemptes)

  1. exempt