fri

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Breton[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Cornish frig (nostril); perhaps related to Proto-Celtic *srognā (compare Welsh ffroen (nostril), Old Irish srón (nose)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fri m

  1. (anatomy) nose

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /friː/, [fʁiːˀ]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Low German vrīen (to marry).

Verb[edit]

fri (imperative fri, present frier or frir, past friede, past participle friet)

  1. propose (to ask for one's hand in marriage)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German vrī.

Adjective[edit]

fri (neuter frit, definite and plural frie, comparative friere, superlative friest)

  1. free
  2. vacant, unoccupied
  3. available
Derived terms[edit]
  • ufri (constrained, inhibited, not free)

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle Low German vrīen (to free).

Verb[edit]

fri (imperative fri, present frier or frir, past friede, past participle friet)

  1. free (to make free)

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

fri

  1. rafsi of lifri.

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German vrī. Cognates inlcude Danish fri, Swedish fri, German frei, Dutch vrei, English free, and Gothic 𐍆𐍂𐌴𐌹𐍃 (freis)

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fri

  1. free, not imprisoned or enslaved
    en fri mann ― a free man
  2. free, not blocked
    fri ferdsel ― free traffic
  3. free, no payment necessary
    fri inngang ― free admission

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Old Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *frijaz, whence also Old Saxon and Old High German frī, Old English frēo. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *prei- (to be fond of), *prey-.

Adjective[edit]

fri

  1. free

Descendants[edit]

  • West Frisian: frij

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *frijaz, whence also Old Saxon frī, Old English frēo, Gothic 𐍆𐍂𐌴𐌹𐍃 (freis). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *prei- (to be fond of), *prey-.

Adjective[edit]

frī

  1. free

Descendants[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *writ- (compare Welsh wrth), from Proto-Indo-European *wert- (to turn) (compare Latin versus (against)).

Preposition[edit]

fri

  1. towards, to
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 16d8
      Bíuu-sa oc irbáig dar far cenn-si fri Maccidóndu.
      I am boasting about you to the Macedonians.
  2. against
  3. with

Inflection[edit]

Person Singular Plural
1st person frimm frinn
2d person frit frib
3d masc. fris friu
3d fem. frie

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *frijaz, whence also Old English frēo. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *prei- (to be fond of), *prey-.

Adjective[edit]

frī (comparative frīoro, superlative frīost)

  1. free

Declension[edit]


Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: fri

Scots[edit]

Preposition[edit]

fri

  1. (South Scots) from

See also[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German vri, from Old Saxon frī, from Proto-Germanic *frijaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fri

  1. free, unconstrained
  2. free, not imprisoned, released
    fri mot borgen ― released on bail
  3. free, without obligations
    Du är fri att göra som du vill.
    You are free to do as you please.
  4. free of charge, gratis

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]