frit

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

French fritte, from frit (fried).

Noun[edit]

frit (plural frits)

  1. A fused mixture of materials used to make glass

Verb[edit]

frit (third-person singular simple present frits, present participle fritting, simple past and past participle fritted)

  1. To add frit to a glass or ceramic mixture
  2. To prepare by heat (the materials for making glass); to fuse partially.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ure to this entry?)

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Adjective[edit]

frit (comparative more frit, superlative most frit)

  1. (UK, dialect, Lincolnshire) frightened
    • 1983 April 19, Margaret Thatcher[1]:
      The right hon. Gentleman is afraid of an election is he? Oh, if I were going to cut and run I'd have gone after the Falklands. Afraid? Frightened? Frit? Couldn't take it? Couldn't stand it?

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

frit

  1. neuter form of fri

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin frictus.

Verb[edit]

frit m (feminine frite, masculine plural frits, feminine plural frites)

  1. past participle of frire

Adjective[edit]

frit m (feminine frite, masculine plural frits, feminine plural frites)

  1. fried

See also[edit]


Guernésiais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French fruit, from Latin fructus.

Noun[edit]

frit m (plural frits)

  1. fruit

Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French fruit, from Latin fructus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

frit m (plural frits)

  1. fruit

Derived terms[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

frit

  1. second-person singular of fri