lit

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See also: lit., lít, &lit, and Lit

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English lit, lut, from Old English lȳt (little, few), from Proto-Germanic *lūtilaz (little, small), from Proto-Indo-European *leud- (to cower, hunch over). Cognate with Old Saxon lut (little), Middle High German lützen (to make small or low, decrease). More at little.

Adjective[edit]

lit (comparative litter or more lit, superlative littest or most lit)

  1. (obsolete) Little.

Noun[edit]

lit (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Little.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English lihte, from Old English līhtte, first and third person singular preterit of līhtan (to light). More at light.

Verb[edit]

lit

  1. simple past tense and past participle of light
  2. (US, dialectal) To run, or light
    • 1988 April 8, Grant Pick, “Johnny Washington's Life”:
      With that the kid lits off down the street, and, what do you know!

Adjective[edit]

lit (comparative more lit, superlative most lit)

  1. illuminated
    • He walked down the lit corridor.
  2. (slang) intoxicated or under the influence of drugs; stoned
  3. (slang) Sexually aroused (usually a female), especially visibly sexually aroused (e.g., labial swelling is present)
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English lit, from Old Norse litr (colour, dye, complexion, face, countenance), from Proto-Germanic *wlitiz, *wlitaz (sight, face), from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (to see). Cognate with Icelandic litur (colour), Old English wlite (brightness, appearance, form, aspect, look, countenance, beauty, splendor, adornment), Old English wlītan (to gaze, look, observe).

Noun[edit]

lit (uncountable)

  1. (UK dialectal) Colour; blee; dye; stain.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English litten, liten, from Old Norse lita (to colour), from litr (colour). See above.

Verb[edit]

lit (third-person singular simple present lits, present participle litting, simple past and past participle litted)

  1. (transitive) To colour; dye.

Etymology 5[edit]

Short for literature.

Noun[edit]

lit (uncountable)

  1. Abbreviated form of literature.
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the verb líta (‘to view’)

Noun[edit]

lit n (genitive singular lits, uncountable)

  1. short wink, view, look

Declension[edit]

n3s Singular
Indefinite Definite
Nominative lit litið
Accusative lit litið
Dative liti litinum
Genitive lits litsins

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lectus.

Noun[edit]

lit m (plural lits)

  1. bed
    Où est-il? Il dort dans son lit. - Where is he? He's sleeping in his bed.

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

lit

  1. third-person singular present indicative of lire
    Jean lit très souvent. - Jean reads very often.

External links[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

lit

  1. rafsi of clite.

Norman[edit]

Noun[edit]

lit m (plural lits)

  1. Alternative form of llit.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

lit

  1. present tense of lita and lite
  2. imperative of lita and lite

Old French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lectus.

Noun[edit]

lit m (oblique plural liz or litz, nominative singular liz or litz, nominative plural lit)

  1. bed

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lit m

  1. lithium

Declension[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Noun[edit]

lit

  1. genitive singular of lite

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

lit c

  1. trust

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German Licht and English light.

Noun[edit]

lit (plural lits)

  1. light
  2. illumination

Declension[edit]


Zay[edit]

Noun[edit]

lit

  1. tree-bark

References[edit]

  • Initial SLLE Survey of the Zway Area by Klaus Wedekind and Charlotte Wedekind