let

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See also: Let, -let, and lét

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English leten, læten, from Old English lǣtan (to allow, let go, bequeath, leave, rent), from Proto-Germanic *lētaną (to leave behind, allow), from Proto-Indo-European *lēd- (to let, leave behind). Cognate with Scots lat, lete (to let, leave), North Frisian lete (to let), West Frisian litte (to let), Dutch laten (to let, leave), German lassen (to let, leave, allow), Swedish låta (to let, allow, leave), Icelandic láta (to let), Albanian (to allow, let, leave).

Verb[edit]

let (third-person singular simple present lets, present participle letting, simple past let or (obsolete) leet, past participle let or (rare) letten)

  1. (transitive) To allow to, not to prevent (+ infinitive, but usually without to).
    • Bible, Exodus viii. 28
      Pharaoh said, I will let you go.
    • Shakespeare
      If your name be Horatio, as I am let to know it is []
    • 1971, Ursula K. Le Guin, The Tombs of Atuan
      He could not be let die of thirst there alone in the dark.
    • 2013 June 21, Oliver Burkeman, “The tao of tech”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 2, page 27: 
      The dirty secret of the internet is that all this distraction and interruption is immensely profitable. Web companies like to boast about […], or offering services that let you "stay up to date with what your friends are doing", [] and so on. But the real way to build a successful online business is to be better than your rivals at undermining people's control of their own attention.
    After he knocked for hours, I decided to let him come in.
  2. To leave.
    Let me alone!
    • Spenser
      Yet neither spins nor cards, ne cares nor frets, / But to her mother Nature all her care she lets.
  3. (transitive) To allow the release of (a fluid).
    The physicians let about a pint of his blood, but to no avail.
  4. (transitive) To allow possession of (a property etc.) in exchange for rent.
    I decided to let the farmhouse to a couple while I was working abroad.
  5. (transitive) To give, grant, or assign, as a work, privilege, or contract; often with out.
    to let the building of a bridge
    to let out the lathing and the plastering
  6. (transitive) Used to introduce an imperative in the first or third person.
    Let's put on a show!
    Let us have a moment of silence.
    Let me just give you the phone number.
    Let P be the point where AB and OX intersect.
  7. (obsolete except with know) To cause (+ bare infinitive).
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte d'Arthur, Book IV:
      Thenne the kyng lete serche how moche people of his party ther was slayne.
    • 1818, John Keats, "To—":
      Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb, / Long hours have to and fro let creep the sand [...].
    Can you let me know what time you'll be arriving?
Synonyms[edit]
Usage notes[edit]

The use of "let" to introduce an imperative may sometimes be confused with its use, as its own imperative, in the sense of "to allow". For example, the sentence "Let me go to the store." could either be a second-person imperative of "let" (addressing someone who might prevent the speaker from going to the store) or a first-person singular imperative of "go" (not implying any such preventer).

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Middle English letten (to hinder, delay), from Old English lettan (to hinder, delay"; literally, "to make late), from Proto-Germanic *latjaną. Akin to Old English latian (to delay), Dutch letten, Old English læt (late). More at late, delay.

Verb[edit]

let (third-person singular simple present lets, present participle letting, simple past letted, past participle let)

  1. (archaic) To hinder, prevent; to obstruct (someone or something).
    • Bible, 2. Thessalonians ii. 7
      He who now letteth will let, until he be taken out of the way.
    • Tennyson
      Mine ancient wound is hardly whole, / And lets me from the saddle.
  2. (obsolete) To prevent or obstruct to do something, or that something happen.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts VIII:
      And as they went on their waye, they cam unto a certayne water, and the gelded man sayde: Se here is water, what shall lett me to be baptised?

Noun[edit]

let (plural lets)

  1. An obstacle or hindrance.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.16:
      Paulus Emilius going to the glorious expedition of Macedon, advertised the people of Rome during his absence not to speake of his actions: For the licence of judgements is an especiall let in great affaires.
    • Latimer
      Consider whether your doings be to the let of your salvation or not.
  2. (tennis) The hindrance caused by the net during serve, only if the ball falls legally.
Translations[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From letět.

Noun[edit]

let m

  1. flight (the act of flying)
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

let

  1. genitive plural of léto

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse léttr, from Proto-Germanic *linhtaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁lengʷʰ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

let (neuter let, definite and plural lette, comparative lettere, superlative lettest)

  1. light
  2. easy
  3. slight
  4. mild

Synonyms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

let

  1. lightly
  2. easily
  3. slightly
  4. mildly

Verb[edit]

let

  1. Imperative of lette.

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

let

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of letten
  2. imperative of letten

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English let.

Interjection[edit]

let

  1. (tennis) indicates a let on service

External links[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

lēt

  1. Romanization of 𐌻𐌴𐍄

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

let

  1. rafsi of gletu.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse litr (colour), related to líta (to see)

Noun[edit]

let m

  1. colour
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

let

  1. imperative of lete

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse litr (colour), related to líta (to see)

Noun[edit]

let m

  1. colour

Alternative forms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From lètjeti.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lȇt m (Cyrillic spelling ле̑т)

  1. flight

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • let” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovene[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lèt m inan (genitive léta, nominative plural léti)

  1. flight

Declension[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English leather.

Noun[edit]

let

  1. leather
  2. strap (of leather)
  3. belt