leet

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Compare Old English hlēte, *hlīete (share, lot), cognate with Old Norse hleyti (share, portion).

Noun[edit]

leet (plural leets)

  1. (Scotland) A portion or list, especially a list of candidates for an office.

Verb[edit]

leet

  1. (obsolete) simple past tense of let

Etymology 2[edit]

Originated 1400–50 from late Middle English lete (meeting), from Anglo-Norman lete and Medieval Latin leta, possibly from Old English gelǣte (crossroads).

Noun[edit]

leet (plural leets)

  1. (UK, obsolete) A regular court in which the certain lords had jurisdiction over local disputes, or the physical area of this jurisdiction.

Etymology 3[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.
Particularly: “Etymology uncertain”

Noun[edit]

leet (plural leets)

  1. (zoology) The European pollock.

Etymology 4[edit]

An aphetic form of elite.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

leet (plural leets)

  1. (Internet slang) Abbreviation of leetspeak.

Adjective[edit]

leet (comparative more leet, superlative most leet)

  1. Of or relating to leetspeak.
  2. (slang) Possessing outstanding skill in a field; expert, masterful.
  3. (slang) Having superior social rank over others; upper class, elite.
  4. (slang) Awesome, typically to describe a feat of skill; cool, sweet.

References[edit]

  • leet” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  • "leet" in the Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, MICRA, 1996, 1998.

Anagrams[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Verb[edit]

leet

  1. third-person singular present indicative of leeën
  2. second-person plural present indicative of leeën
  3. second-person plural imperative of leeën

Norwegian[edit]

Verb[edit]

leet

  1. Past tense and past participle of lee

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Old English hlēte (share, lot).

Noun[edit]

leet (plural leets)

  1. a list