alight

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English alighten, from Old English ālīhtan (to lighten, relieve, alleviate, take off, take away, alight) and Old English ġelīhtan (to lighten, mitigate, assuage), equivalent to a- +‎ light (not heavy).

Verb[edit]

alight (third-person singular simple present alights, present participle alighting, simple past and past participle alighted)

  1. (transitive) To make light or less heavy; lighten; alleviate.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English alighten, from Old English ālīhtan (to alight, dismount), from prefix ā- (compare with Gothic us-, German er-, originally meaning "out") + līhtan (to alight), and Old English ġelīhtan (to alight, approach, come, come down, dismount), equivalent to a- +‎ light (to dismount).

Verb[edit]

alight (third-person singular simple present alights, present participle alighting, simple past and past participle alighted or alit)

  1. (intransitive, with from) To spring down, get down, or descend, as from on horseback or from a carriage; to dismount.
    Passengers are alighting from the carriage
  2. (intransitive, with on) To descend and settle, lodge, rest, or stop.
    A flying bird alights on a tree
    Snow alights on a roof.
  3. (intransitive) To come or chance (upon).
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English alighten, from Old English ālīhtan (to light up, enlighten), equivalent to a- +‎ light. Cognate with German erleuchten (to light up, illuminate).

Verb[edit]

alight (third-person singular simple present alights, present participle alighting, simple past and past participle alit or alighted)

  1. (transitive) To light; light up; illuminate.
  2. (transitive) To set light to; light.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English alight, from Old English *ālīhted, past participle of ālīhtan (to alight). See above.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

alight (not comparable)

  1. Lit, on fire, switched on.
    The sticks were damp and wouldn't catch alight.
  2. (figuratively) Lit; on fire, burning.
    Her face was alight with happiness.
Usage notes[edit]

Used only as a predicative.

Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.