folc

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fulgur.

Noun[edit]

folc m

  1. thunderbolt

Synonyms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish folc (heavy rain, wet weather).

Noun[edit]

folc f (genitive foilce, nominative plural folca)

  1. downpour, flood
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish folcaid (washes).

Verb[edit]

folc (present analytic folcann, future analytic folcfaidh, verbal noun folcadh, past participle folctha)

  1. to bathe
  2. to wash
  3. to immerse, submerge, drench
Conjugation[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
folc fholc bhfolc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fulką (people). Cognate with Old Frisian folk, Old Saxon folk, Old Dutch folk (Dutch volk), Old High German folk (German Volk), Old Norse folk, fólk. Possibly ultimately from a Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁-go-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

folc n

  1. people, nation, race
  2. army
  3. (in the plural) people in general

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Noun[edit]

folc n

  1. Alternative spelling of folk.