folk

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English folk, from Old English folc, from Proto-Germanic *fulką (compare West Frisian folk, Dutch volk and German Volk), from *fulka- ("crowd, army"), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁-go (compare Welsh ôl 'track', Lithuanian pulkas 'crowd', Old Church Slavonic plŭkŭ 'army division', Albanian plog 'barn, heap'; the Slavic and Lithuanian words may have been borrowed from Proto-Germanic instead). (Some have also attempted to link the word to Latin vulgus, populus or plebs.[1]) Related to follow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

folk (not comparable)

  1. Of or pertaining to the inhabitants of a land, their culture, tradition, or history.
  2. Of or pertaining to common people as opposed to ruling classes or elites.
  3. (architecture) Of or related to local building materials and styles.
  4. Believed or transmitted by the common people; not academically correct or rigorous.
    folk psychology; folk linguistics

Noun[edit]

folk (plural folk or folks)

  1. (archaic) A grouping of smaller peoples or tribes as a nation.
    • J. R. Green
      The organization of each folk, as such, sprang mainly from war.
  2. The inhabitants of a region, especially the native inhabitants.
    • 1907, Race Prejudice, Jean Finot, p. 251:
      We thus arrive at a most unexpected imbroglio. The French have become a Germanic folk and the Germanic folk have become Gaulish!
  3. (plural only, plural: folks) One’s relatives, especially one’s parents.
  4. (music) Folk music.
  5. (plural only) People in general.
    Young folk, old folk, everybody come, / To our little Sunday School and have a lot of fun.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 1, A Cuckoo in the Nest[1]:
      “[…] the awfully hearty sort of Christmas cards that people do send to other people that they don't know at all well. You know. The kind that have mottoes [] . And then, when you see [the senders], you probably find that they are the most melancholy old folk with malignant diseases. […]”
  6. (plural only) A particular group of people.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/folk

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse fólk (people), folk, from Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɔlk/, [fʌlˀɡ̊]

Noun[edit]

folk n (singular definite folket, plural indefinite folk)

  1. people
  2. men
  3. crew
Inflection[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English folk (folk music).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɔvɡ/, [fʌwɡ̊]

Noun[edit]

folk c (singular definite folken, not used in plural form)

  1. folk music (contemporary music in the style of traditional folk music)

See also[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

folk

  1. (music) folk, folk music

Declension[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fólk (people), folk, from Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Noun[edit]

folk n (definite singular folket, indefinite plural folk, definite plural folka or folkene)

  1. a people
  2. people in general
  3. folk

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fulką, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁-go.

Noun[edit]

folk n

  1. people, folk

Descendants[edit]


Old Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Noun[edit]

folk n

  1. people, folk

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • West Frisian: folk

Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Noun[edit]

folk n

  1. people, folk

Declension[edit]


Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English folc, from Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Noun[edit]

folk (plural folks)

  1. people, folk

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse fólk (people), folk, from Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

folk n

  1. (uncountable) people in general, humans
  2. a people, a nation; in compounds referring to local or national traditions (folklore), national institutions (folkhem) or international relations (folkrätt)

Declension[edit]

Compounds[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian folk, from Proto-Germanic *fulką.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

folk (plural folken)

  1. people, folk