gage

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See also: Gage

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English gage, from later Old French or early Middle French gager (verb), (also guagier in Old French) gage (noun), ultimately from Frankish *waddi, from Germanic (whence English wed). Doublet of wage, from the same origin through the Old Northern French variant wage. See also mortgage.

Verb[edit]

gage (third-person singular simple present gages, present participle gaging, simple past and past participle gaged)

  1. (obsolete) To give or deposit as a pledge or security; to pawn.
    • Shakespeare
      A moiety competent / Was gaged by our king.
  2. (archaic) To wager, to bet.
    • Ford
      This feast, I'll gage my life, / Is but a plot to train you to your ruin.
  3. To bind by pledge, or security; to engage.
    • Shakespeare
      Great debts / Wherein my time, sometimes too prodigal, / Hath left me gaged.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

gage (plural gages)

  1. Something, such as a glove or other pledge, thrown down as a challenge to combat (now usually figurative).
    • 1819, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe:
      “But it is enough that I challenge the trial by combat — there lies my gage.” She took her embroidered glove from her hand, and flung it down before the Grand Master with an air of mingled simplicity and dignity…
    • 1988, James McPherson, Battle Cry for Freedom, Oxford 2003, page 166:
      The gage was down for a duel that would split the Democratic party and ensure the election of a Republican president in 1860.
  2. (obsolete) Something valuable deposited as a guarantee or pledge; security, ransom.
    • Sandys
      Nor without gages to the needy lend.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See gauge.

Verb[edit]

gage (third-person singular simple present gages, present participle gaging, simple past and past participle gaged)

  1. Alternative spelling of gauge. To measure.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Named after the Gage family of England, who imported the greengage from France.

Noun[edit]

gage (plural gages)

  1. A subspecies of plum, Prunus domestica subsp. italica.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French gage, gauge, guage, itself (possibly through a Vulgar Latin root *wadium from Frankish *waddi (a Germanic legal term, cognate with Old English wedd). Compare English wage, ultimately of the same source through the Anglo-Norman/Old Northern French variant wage.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gage m (plural gages)

  1. a pledge or security
  2. a guarantee
  3. proof, evidence

Related terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

gage m (oblique plural gages, nominative singular gages, nominative plural gage)

  1. wage (regular remuneration)
  2. (figuratively) payment
    • circa 1176, Chrétien de Troyes, Cligès:
      « Garz, fet il, ça leiroiz le gage
      de mon seignor que tu as mort [»]
      "Boy" said he "this will be payback
      for my lord that you killed."

Descendants[edit]