hitch

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

A hitch (knot that attaches to an object)

hitch (plural hitches)

  1. A sudden pull.
  2. Any of various knots used to attach a rope to an object other than another rope [1]. See List of hitch knots in Wikipedia.
  3. A fastener or connection point, as for a trailer.
    His truck sported a heavy-duty hitch for his boat.
  4. (informal) A problem, delay or source of difficulty.
    The banquet went off without a hitch. (Meaning the banquet went smoothly.)
  5. A hidden or unfavorable condition or element; a catch.
    The deal sounds too good to be true. What's the hitch?
  6. A period of time. Most often refers to time spent in the military.
    She served two hitches in Vietnam.
    U.S. TROOPS FACE LONGER ARMY HITCH ; SOLDIERS BOUND FOR IRAQ, ... WILL BE RETAINED
    Stephen J. Hedges & Mike Dorning, Chicago Tribune; Orlando Sentinel; Jun 3, 2004; pg. A.1;

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

hitch (third-person singular simple present hitches, present participle hitching, simple past and past participle hitched)

  1. (transitive) To pull with a jerk.
    She hitched her jeans up and then tightened her belt.
  2. (transitive) To attach, tie or fasten.
    He hitched the bedroll to his backpack and went camping.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 8, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Philander went into the next room, which was just a lean-to hitched on to the end of the shanty, and came back with a salt mackerel that dripped brine like a rainstorm. Then he put the coffee pot on the stove and rummaged out a loaf of dry bread and some hardtack.
  3. (informal) To marry oneself to; especially to get hitched.
  4. (informal, transitive) contraction of hitchhike, to thumb a ride.
    to hitch a ride
  5. (intransitive) To become entangled or caught; to be linked or yoked; to unite; to cling.
    • South
      atoms [] which at length hitched together
  6. (intransitive) To move interruptedly or with halts, jerks, or steps; said of something obstructed or impeded.
    • Alexander Pope
      Slides into verse, and hitches in a rhyme.
    • Fuller
      To ease themselves [] by hitching into another place.
  7. (UK) To strike the legs together in going, as horses; to interfere.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Knots and Splices by Cyrus L Day, Adlard Coles Nautical, 2001