loch

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See also: Loch

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Scottish Gaelic loch.

Noun[edit]

loch (plural lochs)

  1. (Scotland) A lake.
  2. (Scotland) A bay or arm of the sea.
Synonyms[edit]

(lake):

Hyponyms[edit]

(sea inlet):

Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

French looch, from Arabic.

Noun[edit]

loch

  1. Alternative form of looch.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch log.

Noun[edit]

loch m (plural lochs)

  1. (nautical) chip log, log

Etymology 2[edit]

From English loch.

Noun[edit]

loch m (plural lochs)

  1. loch

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish loch, from Proto-Indo-European *laku- (compare Latin lacus, Old English lagu).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loch m (genitive locha, nominative plural lochanna)

  1. lake

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *laku-.

Noun[edit]

loch n, m

  1. lake
  2. inlet of the sea
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

loch

  1. black, dark

Polish[edit]

loch

Etymology[edit]

From German Loch < Old High German loh < Proto-Germanic *lōgą (site, situation, camp) < Proto-Indo-European *legʰ- (to be situated, lie).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loch m

  1. dungeon (an underground prison or vault)

Declension[edit]


Scots[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Scottish Gaelic loch.

Noun[edit]

loch (plural lochs)

  1. lake, loch, firth

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish loch.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ɫ̪ɔx], /ɫ̪ɔx/

Noun[edit]

loch f (genitive locha, plural lochan)

  1. lake
  2. arm of the sea
  3. fiord

Derived terms[edit]