ree

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See also: REE

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

ree (plural rees)

  1. Alternative form of rei.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English rei, reh, reoh, from Old English hrēoh (rough, fierce, wild, angry, disturbed, troubled, stormy, tempestuous), from Proto-Germanic *hreuhaz (bad, wild), from Proto-Indo-European *krewa- (raw meat, fresh blood). Cognate with Scots ree, rae, ray (ree), Old Saxon hrē (evil, bad, angry), Gothic [script?] (raúhtjan, to become angry, rage against). Related to Old English hrēaw (raw, uncooked). More at raw.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • rie (Scotland)

Adjective[edit]

ree (comparative reer or more ree, superlative reest or most ree)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) Wild; fierce; outrageous; overexcited; frenzied; delirious; crazy.
  2. (Now chiefly dialectal) Befuddled with liquor; half-drunk; tipsy.

Noun[edit]

ree (plural rees)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) A state of befuddlement; intoxication.
  2. (Now chiefly dialectal) A state of great excitement or frenzy.

Verb[edit]

ree (third-person singular simple present rees, present participle reeing, simple past and past participle reed)

  1. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To become extremely excited; fly into a rage.
  2. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To drive into a state of excitement; fire with enthusiasm.

Etymology 3[edit]

Compare riddle a sieve.

Verb[edit]

ree (third-person singular simple present rees, present participle reeing, simple past and past participle reed)

  1. (obsolete, UK, dialect) To riddle; to sift; to separate or throw off.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Mortimer to this entry?)

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ree f, n (plural reeën, diminutive reetje n)

  1. roe

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ree

  1. again

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ree f

  1. Feminine plural form of reo

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

ree m

  1. vocative singular of reus

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish , from Proto-Celtic *rīxs, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃rḗǵs (ruler, king).

Noun[edit]

ree m (genitive ree, plural reeaghyn or reeghyn)

  1. (nobility, chess, card games, draughts) king

Derived terms[edit]