steven

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See also: Steven and števen

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English steven (voice, command, constitution), from Old English stefn, stemn (voice), from Proto-Germanic *stebnō, *stamnijō (voice), from Proto-Indo-European *stomen- (mouth, muzzle). Cognate with Old Frisian stifne, stemme (voice), Old Saxon stemna (voice) (Dutch stem), Old High German stimma, stimna (voice) (German Stimme), Gothic 𐍃𐍄𐌹𐌱𐌽𐌰 (stibna, voice), Ancient Greek στόμα (stóma, mouth). See also stevvon.

Noun[edit]

steven (plural stevens)

  1. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) The voice, now especially when loud or strong.
  2. (obsolete) Speech, language.
  3. Voice; cry; that which is uttered; petition; prayer.
  4. A word, command, bidding or direction given.
  5. A promise, one's word.
  6. An outcry, shout, or loud call; a clamour/clamor, noise; din.
    • 1826, James Hogg, Queen Hynde vi, in Poems (1865) 262:
      All nature roar'd in one dire steven; Heaven cried to earth, and earth to heaven.
  7. A sound, the sound of a horn; melody, tune; song; sound made by an animal or a bird.
    • The Golden Asse
      [] whereby the little birds weening that the spring time had bin come, did chirp and sing in their steven melodiously
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

steven (third-person singular simple present stevens, present participle stevening, simple past and past participle stevened)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To speak; utter; describe; tell of; name.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To voice an opinion; vote.
  3. (transitive, archaic) To vouch; speak up (for).
  4. (transitive, dialectal) To bespeak.
  5. (intransitive, dialectal) To talk; call out; shout; make a noise.
Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English steven (appointment), from Old English stefn (a time, turn, tour of duty), from Proto-Germanic *stabnijaz, *stabnijô (fixed time), from Proto-Indo-European *stebh- (a stake, post; to support, stamp, insist, become angry). Cognate with Middle Low German stevene (a court appointment), Old Norse stefna (appointment, meeting). More at staff.

Noun[edit]

steven (plural stevens)

  1. (obsolete) A time, occasion.
    • 1788, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens, The dramatick writings of Will. Shakspere, with the Notes of all the various Commentators:
      I should choose to read "at this dull season," rather than this dull steven, [...]— John Monck Mason.
  2. (obsolete) A set time; a date or appointment.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book VIII:
      And that same nyght that the steavyn was sette betwyxte Segwarydes wyff and Sir Trystrames, so Kynge Marke armed and made hym redy [...].

Verb[edit]

steven (third-person singular simple present stevens, present participle stevening, simple past and past participle stevened)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To call; summon; command; appoint.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To alternate; take turns.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch stēvene.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ste‧ven

Noun[edit]

steven m (plural stevens)

  1. the part of a ship's deck that stretches along the entire length of the keel including the bow and the stern

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English stefn, stemn (voice, sound). More at steven.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

steven (plural stevens)

  1. The voice of a human being; a voice.
  2. A vocal sound.
  3. sound; tonal pattern.
  4. Manner of speaking.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English stefn (appointed time).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

steven

  1. time, set time, appointment
    • c. 1385, Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Knight's Tale’, Canterbury Tales:
      It is ful fair a man to bere hym euene, / For al day meeten men at vnset steuene.
  2. period of time, occasion
    • 1398, John Trevisa, trans. Bartholomaeus, De Proprietatibus Rerum:
    • Suche stenche is continual and comeþ nouȝt by stemnes.
      (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English stewin, from Old English stefn (voice), from Proto-Germanic *stebnō, *stamnijō (voice), from Proto-Indo-European *stomen- (mouth, muzzle). Cognates: see above, steven.

Noun[edit]

steven (plural stevens)

  1. voice
  2. a loud outcry