нога

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Bulgarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *noga, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃nogʰ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

нога́ (nogáf

  1. (dated, dialectal) foot
    Synonym: крак (krak) (regular term)
  2. (dated, dialectal) leg
    Synonym: крак (krak) (regular term)

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • нога in Rečnik na bǎlgarskija ezik (Institut za bǎlgarski ezik)
  • нога in Rečnik na bǎlgarskija ezik (Čitanka.Info)

Macedonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *noga, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃nogʰ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

нога (nogaf (plural нозе, diminutive ноџе)

  1. leg
  2. foot

Usage notes[edit]

  • When speaking of feet, one almost always used this word. However, if one wishes to specifically emphasize that feet and not legs are the subject, one would use the word стапало (stapalo).

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • нога in Makedonisch Info (germansko-makedonski rečnik, makedonsko-germanski rečnik)

Old Church Slavonic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *noga, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃nogʰ-. Cognate with Lithuanian nagas, Sanskrit नख (nakhá), Persian ناخن(nâxon), Old Armenian եղունգն (ełungn), Ancient Greek ὄνυξ (ónux), Latin unguis, Old Irish inga, Old English næġl (English nail).

Noun[edit]

нога (nogaf

  1. leg
  2. foot

Declension[edit]

Singular Dual Plural
nominative нога ноѕѣ ногꙑ
genitive ногꙑ ногоу ногъ
dative ноѕѣ ногама ногамъ
accusative ногѫ ноѕѣ ногꙑ
instrumental ногоѭ ногама ногами
locative ноѕѣ ногоу ногахъ
vocative ного

Related terms[edit]


Old East Slavic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *noga.

Noun[edit]

нога (nogaf

  1. leg
  2. foot

Declension[edit]

Singular Dual Plural
nominative нога нозѣ ногы
genitive ногы ногу ногъ
dative нозѣ ногама ногамъ
accusative ногу нозѣ ногы
instrumental ногою ногама ногами
locative нозѣ ногу ногахъ
vocative ного нозѣ ногы

Russian[edit]

Russian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ru

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *noga, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃nogʰ- (claw, nail) Cognate with English nail and ungulate, Latvian nagas, Persian ناخن(nâxon), Latin unguis, Spanish uña, Welsh ewin.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [nɐˈɡa]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

нога́ (nogáf inan (genitive ноги́, nominative plural но́ги, genitive plural ног)

  1. leg
    встать на́ ногиvstatʹ ná nogito recover from illness; become independent financially and economically
  2. foot

Usage notes[edit]

  • Pronunciation of the genitive plural ног (nog) as “нох” is considered old-fashioned.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Rusyn[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *noga, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃nogʰ-.

Noun[edit]

но́га (nóhaf

  1. (dated) foot
  2. (dated) leg

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *noga, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃nogʰ-.

Noun[edit]

но̀га f (Latin spelling nòga)

  1. leg
  2. (colloquial, totum pro parte) foot

Declension[edit]


Ukrainian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *noga, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃nogʰ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

нога́ (noháf inan (genitive ноги́, nominative plural но́ги, genitive plural ніг)

  1. leg

Declension[edit]

References[edit]