-che

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Central Franconian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • -elche (see notes below)
  • -je (Ripuarian only; see notes below)

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German -ihhīn, from Proto-Germanic *-ikīną, a double diminutive, from *-ikaz + *-īną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Suffix[edit]

-che (plural -cher)

  1. forms a diminutive noun
    Stadt (town, city) + ‎-che → ‎Städtche

Usage notes[edit]

  • Generally, all diminutive nouns are neuter, but some dialects may still follow the older rule of treating diminutives according to the gender of the basic noun (as in Luxembourgish).
  • Nouns whose stem ends in a back consonant, namely -ch, -g, -k, -ng, or -sch, regularly use the extended suffix -elche: Bröck (bridge)Bröggelche. However, in Ripuarian an etymological distinction is usually followed, according to which the extended suffix follows only original back consonants but not ones that derive from Old High German (OHG) alveolars; hence: Weng (wine) from OHG wīnWengche (not *Wengelche); Wursch (sausage) from OHG wurstWürschje (not *Würschelche).
  • After -f, -s, -ß, -v, and -sch (if applicable), the suffix -che becomes -je in Ripuarian, but not in Moselle Franconian; hence: Foß (foot) → Ripurian Fößje, Moselle Franconian Feeßche.

Derived terms[edit]


Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German -ihhīn, from Proto-Germanic *-ikīną, a double diminutive, from *-ikaz + *-īną. Compare German -chen, Dutch -ke.

Suffix[edit]

-che (plural -cher)

  1. (diminutive) -let, -ling, -kin

Derived terms[edit]